March 29, 2009

J-lo loves starbucks


Jennifer Lopez drinks a Starbucks coffee as she leaves a Los Angeles store after shopping on Saturday (04.22.06). Later that evening Lopez and her husband Marc Anthony attended a reception to raise money for Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton's re-election campaign in Beverly Hills.





March 25, 2009

Jamie Pressly's Son Addicted to Coffee

Jaime Pressly says her 16-month-old son is addicted to Cuban coffee. The "My Name is Earl" star--who is engaged to DJ Eric Calvo--admits Dezi can't get enough of the caffeinated drink. She said,My kid is really loud. He is just like 'MOMMY' all the time. And I'll be standing right next to him. He means no harm. He just wants a cup of Cuban coffee!



aime also revealed her son's addiction is being encouraged by Cuban-born Eric, who is better known by his professional name Eric Cubiche. She added, You think when Eric and Dezi are speaking to each other in Spanish they're mad, but they're really just saying, 'Hey, do you want to go get a cup of coffee?

The 31-year-old actress added she was surprised that Devi didnt inherit his fathers dark skin. She said, Eric is very, very, very dark. He's Cuban with an olive complexion. Dezi came out looking like me. It's pretty crazy! Although he does tan really well!

Taken from : Showbiz.com

March 24, 2009

Katie Holmes Keeps Coffee Close




After rehearsals for her new Broadway play, Katie Holmes carries her trusty coffee container while bringing back the “pegged jeans” look in New York City on Thursday.

The 29-year-old Dawson’s Creek actress’ husband Tom Cruise has been named in a $250 million Scientology lawsuit filed by a former member. The lawsuit accuses the leaders of the faith of harassment. Mr. Cruise is reportedly second in line to the Scientology head David Miscavage.



March 13, 2009

Caribbean hot Coffee drinks

1 coconut
2 cups milk
4 cups strong coffee
1 tablespoon sugar

1. Punch two holes in to coconut, pour liquid into saucepan
2. Bake coconut for 30 minutes at 300 F degrees
3. Break open coconut, remove meat, and grate.
4. Mix coconut meat, coconut liquid, and milk in a sauce pan
5. Heat over low heat until creamy.
6. Strain
7. Toast grated coconut under broiler
8. Mix milk mixture, coffee, and sugar
9. Pour into mugs, garnish with toasted coconut.





Nogged Coffee Drinks

1 cup coffee
1 egg yolk
1/2 cup cream
dash nutmeg

1. Beat sugar and egg yolk together
2. Place cream into sauce pan, and heat over low setting
3. Whisk in egg mixture
4. Heat to 200 F degrees
5. Pour coffee into to cups, and top with cream mixture
6. garnish with nutmeg





Mexican Mocha - Coffee drinks

1 1/2 cups strong coffee
4 teaspoons chocolate syrup
3/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1 tablespoon sugar
1/2 cup whipping cream

1. Put 1 teaspoon of chocolate syrup into each cup
2. Mix Whipping cream, 1/4 teaspoon of the cinnamon, nutmeg, and sugar.
3. Whip until you have soft peaks
4. Place the last 1/2 teaspoon of cinnamon into coffee, and stir
5. Pour coffee into cups, stir to mix in chocolate syrup
6. Top with whipped cream mixture.





Cafe Borgia Hot Coffee

for 4 servings


2 cups strong Italian coffee
2 cups hot chocolate
whipped cream
grated orange peel (garnish)
1. Mix coffee and hot chocolate
2. Pour into mugs
3. Top with whipped cream and orange peel





Coffee as a Spiritual Sacrament

Coffee has a long history as spiritual substance. Frederick Wellman, in Coffee: Botany, Cultivation, and Utilization, describes an African blood-brother ceremony in which "blood of the two pledging parties is mixed and put between the twin seeds of a coffee fruit and the whole swallowed."


Coffee in its modern form, as a hot, black beverage, was first used as a medicine, next as an aid to prayer and meditation by Arabian monastics, much as green tea is used by Zen monks in Japan to celebrate and fortify. Pilgrims to Mecca carried coffee all over the Moslem world. It became secularized, but the religious association remained. Some Christians at first were wont to brand coffee as "that blacke bitter invention of Satan," as opposed to good Christian wine, but in the sixteenth century Pope Clement VIII is said to have sampled coffee and given it his official blessing.



Coffee Ceremonies

For people in the Horn of Africa and parts of the Middle East coffee has maintained its religious connotations, and the ritual aspects remain conscious and refined. Ethiopians and Eritreans brought their coffee ceremonies with them as they immigrated to the United States. My first experience with a formal coffee ceremony was in the apartment of an Eritrean friend in a thoroughly urbanized part of Oakland, California.

His wife carefully roasted the green coffee beans in a shallow pan, passed the just-roasted, steaming beans around the room so that everyone could enjoy their sweet black smoke, cooled them on a small straw mat, ground them in an electric grinder (at home in Eritrea she would use a large mortar and pestle, but she explained that the pounding disturbed her downstairs neighbors!), brewed the coffee in a traditional clay pot, and served it in tiny cups. The entire event was an opportunity to talk and gossip while basking in the smell and spectacle of the preparation of the beverage whose consumption consummated the morning.

On a less literal level, a multitude of coffee ceremonies take place simultaneously all over the world: in office lunchrooms, in espresso bars, in Swedish parlors, in Japanese coffeehouses, wherever coffee drinkers gather to stare into space, to read a newspaper, or to share a moment, outside time and obligation, with their friends. Ritual is further wrapped up in the smell and taste of coffee. Certain aromas, flavors, gestures, and sounds combine to symbolize coffee and suggest a mood of contemplation or well-being in an entire culture. This, I am convinced, was the reason for the persistence of the pumping percolator in American culture in the 1940s through 1960s. To Americans of that era, the gentle popping sound of the percolator and the smell the popping liberated signified coffee and made them feel good before they even lifted a cup.

Other cultures have similar associations. To people from the Middle East and parts of Eastern Europe, the froth that gathers in the pot when brewing coffee is an indispensable part of the drink, not only because it tastes good but because it symbolizes the meditative glow that comes with brewing and consuming coffee. Italians put a comparable, if somewhat less ceremonial, emphasis on the froth produced by espresso brewing. An Italian will not take a tazzina of espresso seriously if it is not topped with a layer of what to a filter-coffee drinker may look like gold-colored scum. Yet this golden scum, or crema, is what marks espresso as the real thing. Similar satisfaction resides in the milk froth that tops such drinks as caffè latte and cappuccino. The froth has almost no flavor, but a cappuccino is not a cappuccino without it.



The world wide tradition of coffee

The tradition of the coffeehouse has spread worldwide. Australia is paved with Italian-style caffes and Japan has evolved its kisatens, an elegant interpretation of American 1950s-style coffee shops and coffeehouses. In Great Britain, the espresso-bar craze of the 1950s came and went, but shows vigorous signs of a Starbucks-style comeback. Other parts of Europe and the Middle East have their own ongoing traditions. In Vienna, the home of the first European coffeehouses, the café tradition has undergone a renaissance.


In the United States, the 1930s and 1940s brought the classic diner, and the 1950s and 1960s the vinyl-boothed coffee shop, together with the coffeehouse -- haunt of rebels, poets, beboppers, and beatniks. All of these incarnations are still with us. The classic diner is enjoying a revival, coffee shops still minister to the bottomless cup, and in American cities hundreds of new coffeehouses cater to a fresh generation of rebels, complete with funky furniture, radical posters, jazz, and folksingers.

But the 1970s and 1980s appear to have produced still another North American café tradition. Classic Italian-American caffes of the 1950s, like Caffè Reggio in Manhattan and Caffè Trieste in San Francisco, appear to have influenced the development of a style of café or caffe that takes as its starting point an immigrant's nostalgic vision of the lost and gracious caffes of prewar Italy. From that vision come the light and spacious interiors of the new North American urban café, together with the open seating, the simple and straightforward furnishing, and an atmosphere formal enough to discourage customers from swaggering around and putting their feet on chairs, yet informal enough to mix students doing homework and executives having business meetings. Add an espresso machine and some light new American cuisine, and the latest version of the American café is defined.


The Coffee Ritual

Ritual often chooses for its vehicle consciousness-altering substances such as wine, peyote or coffee. People may assume a bit of God resides in these substances, because through using them they are separated for a moment from the ordinariness of things and can seize their reality more clearly. This is why a ritual is not only a gesture of hospitality and reassurance, but a celebration of a break in routine, a moment when the human drive for survival lets up and people can simply be together. This last aspect is to me the fundamental meaning of the coffee break, the coffee klatch, the happy hour, and the after-dinner coffee. These are secular rituals that, in unobtrusive but essential ways, help maintain humanness in ourselves and with one another.

In many cultures, the ritual aspects of drinking tea or coffee are given semi-religious status. The most famous of such rituals is the Japanese tea ceremony, in which powdered green tea is whipped in a traditional bowl to form a rich frothy drink, then is ceremonially passed, in complete silence, from one participant to the next. The tea ceremony is consciously structured as a communal meditation devoted to contemplating the presence of eternity in the moment. Doubtless the caffeine in the tea aids in such psychic enterprise.

from
coffeereview.com



Six Steps to Great Coffee At Home

Here at Coffee Daily , we aim to provide you with coffee information that is useful and to-the-point. Our six-step guide is here to help you get straight into enjoying coffee making, without wading through exhaustive detail and complex reviews.

As you read through each of the steps, you will find buying tips designed to help you find the right coffee maker or machine for you. You will also find great brewing tips and instructions for each coffee maker. For making great coffee at home, we have all you need to know!

Follow these steps for happy coffee making!...


Step 1 - To Espresso or not to Espresso?:
The first step to choosing your coffee maker is to decide whether you would prefer an espresso machine or other (drip, filter, percolator, etc.). This article helps you decide. The article also covers the "French Press" and "Stovetop Moka Express" for those coffee lovers who prefer not to use a machine.

Step 2 - Manual, Steam, Pump, Automatic or Super-Automatic Espresso Machines?:
If after reading Step 1 you decide that an espresso machine suits you best, the next step is to choose the type of espresso machine. Should it be manual or automatic? Should it use the steam or pump method of extraction? This article helps you decide.

Step 3 - Drip, Filter, Plunger or Combination Coffee Maker?:
If after reading Step 1 you decide that you would prefer one of the other types of coffee maker, the next step is to choose the type (drip, filter, percolator, French press, etc.). This article helps you decide.

Step 4 - Get the Beans:
Once you have invested in your own coffee maker, you will no doubt want to try different styles of beans and roasts. The articles in this section cover all you need to know.

Step 5 - Accessorize:
Accessories for coffee makers, machine and coffee lovers. From milk frothers to cups, mugs and filter paper, these articles will help you choose the right accessory.

Step 6 - Learn More About Coffee:
Once you begin learning about coffee, and indeed enjoying coffee, you will find that there is always more to know - coffee making is a continual learning curve. These articles are provided to help you enjoy that learning curve.



March 12, 2009

Coffee crêpes




Ingredients

4 teaspoonful of instant coffee
200 g of flour
1/4 Kg. of sweetened cream
1/4 litre of milk
4 eggs
2 tablespoons of sugar
1 small glass of rum
50 grs. of flour

Preparation:

In a bowl, mix the flour, the sugar, the eggs, the milk, the rum and 2 teaspoonful of instant coffee.
Melt a little butter in a pan
Pour 3 tablespoons of the mixing and move the pan so as the mixing covers the pan totally.
Turn it
Put the crêpes in a tray
Prepare a cream with 2 teaspoonful of instant coffee, mixed with the cream.
Serve the crêpes with the cream on top.



The Golden Rules of Good Coffee

When it's all said, making a good cup of coffee at home is not a complicated thing. In fact, you only need to remember a small number of fundamental rules to make good coffee. How many of those rules you adhere to is up to you. The more you adhere to, the better the cup of coffee you brew. Adhere to them all, and you make the perfect cup of coffee at home.

It's key to your whole process of making great coffee at home to plan in advance so that you cover each of your bases.


Golden Rule #1: Ground coffee expires at a faster rate than whole coffee beans.
Further to the first Golden Rule, coffee goes stale for as long as it's not kept airtight. In addition ground coffee deteriorates at a different rate than whole coffee beans. Groundd coffee deteriorates at a much faster rate. This even goes for grocery store-bought ground coffee which comes airtight in a vacuum-packed packaging or tin container, but begins to go stale as soon as you break the seal. Most North Americans seem satisfied with the quality of barely air-sealed ground coffee to get them up in the morning and get them through the day. But here, we're talking about good and fresh coffee. Keep coffee beans whole until you're ready to brew them. Then, grind only what you need to grind and brew it. Invest in whole coffee beans from a local retailer. They're worth having for that perfect cup of coffee at home.


Golden Rule #2: Air is the enemy of coffee.
Coffee is perishable, and anything perishable goes stale as much as it's in contact with air. Think about investing in containers designed to be airtight, most commonly ceramic containers with latch-closes and a rubber band squeezed between the lid and container. "Tupperware" containers and sandwich bags are better than leaving coffee in open air, but don't do the same job of keeping air out and keeping coffee from going stale as a container designed to be airtight. Contrary to what many believe, freezing your coffee beans doesn't keep them from going stale. In fact, the humidity from the freshness of coffee beans will congeal and once thawed, evaporate quicker from the beans.


Golden Rule #3: Coffee is mostly water.

In fact, it's 99% water. If you don't get the water right, you might still make a decent cup of coffee, but why take chances with such an important ingredient? If you take precautions with drinking water, remember those precautions with coffee water. Purified water makes good coffee. At a minimum, keep a Brita water pitcher full in the fridge.


Golden Rule #4: Heat is the enemy of brewed coffee.

We like our coffee hot. It's a drink served hot. But, heat burns anything liquid the more that liquid is exposed to the heat. After 20 minutes of your coffee sitting on the coffee machine's heat plate, consider that coffee to be beginning to burn. After 40 minutes, the difference in taste should be noticeable. And, burnt coffee is not distinguished like blackened chicken or tuna. Burnt coffee is not good coffee. Some coffee machines have heat settings for the plate to resolve the very problem of burnt coffee. If you have such a machine, just leave the heat setting on Low and never touch it again. Even better machines have a switch to identify that a small amount of coffee is being made, say 2-4 cups. After all, the heat required for a full pot is a lot of heat to apply to only a quarter or half of a pot. The less expensive coffee machines don't tend to have these bells and whistles. They normally just have an on/off switch. As with most quality, you get what you pay for.


Golden Rule #5: Clean everything that comes in the coffee's path.

The compartment of the coffee machine that holds the grinds. Want proof? Wipe yours right now with a paper towel. You should notice coffee residue on the paper towel from multiple brewings. Your coffee pot. Your mug. Your spoon. Your spoon-holder. All of these things come into contact with brewed coffee, and like any liquid, it leaves its mark unless entirely cleaned. Most people wouldn't consider that this coffee residue is as perishable as coffee, and begins to go stale over a short period. In fact, there is a natural oil in coffee that makes its residue extra 'sticky'. Soap and water is the easiest way to clean anything.


Golden Rule #6: Plan for when you make coffee.
If there's one theme connecting all of the previous five Golden Rules, it's that it takes planning and preparation to make good coffee.

Tools: To make the perfect cup of coffee, it starts with the coffee machine. Buy a coffee machine with heat settings for the plate, a switch to identify that a small pot is being made, and a tone that sounds or beeps to identify that the coffee is finished brewing. That way, you can pour a cup as quickly as it's brewed.

Storage: Now, you need ceramic containers designed to be airtight. These are available from kitchen stores for spices, beans, and many cooking ingredients. That have a metal latch that creates the airtight seal, which should consist of a rubber hand underneath the lid in place to seal with the container when the latch is closed.

Whole Beans: Next, the main event. The coffee beans themselves. Buy them whole. Often when you do, you'll be asked, "Do you want the beans ground?" Answer with a 'no', but act like you're insulted, too. You should have a nearby retailer that sells whole coffee beans, and I don't mean the grocery store. The beans that most grocery stores sell in addition to ground coffee is whole, but there's no accounting for how a grocery store takes care of its coffee beans. Ideally, you want a cafe. Starbucks sells quality coffee beans, in my humble opinion, but the price premium is hard to justify. If all you have near to you is a grocery store or Starbucks, let me know and I'll try to direct you to a good online retailer with affordable prices.


Planning: When you are preparing to make a pot of coffee, make sure all the tools are clean. Measure out as many whole coffee beans as you intend to grind for this pot. Click here for guidelines on the correct ratio of coffee to water. After they're ground, get them in the coffee machine along with some fresh, purified water. As soon as the brewing is complete, begin serving your coffee. If your guests or yourself are having more than one cup of coffee, you might even consider making multiple pots, one for each "round" of coffee that you'll be serving.

Coffee may help protect against liver cancer

That hot cup of coffee may do more than just provide a tasty energy boost. It also may help prevent the most common type of liver cancer.

A study of more than 90,000 Japanese found that people who drank coffee daily or nearly every day had half the liver cancer risk of those who never drank coffee.

The American Cancer Society estimates that 18,920 new cases of liver cancer were diagnosed in the United States last year and some 14,270 people died of the illness. Causes include hepatitis, cirrhosis, excess alcohol consumption and diseases causing chronic inflammation of the liver.

Animal studies have suggested a protective association of coffee with liver cancer, so the research team led by Monami Inoue of the National Cancer Center in Tokyo analyzed a 10-year public health study to determine coffee use by people diagnosed with liver cancer and people who did not have cancer.

Decreased risk
They found the likely occurrence of liver cancer in people who never or almost never drank coffee was 547.2 cases per 100,000 people over 10 years.

But for people who drank coffee daily the risk was 214.6 cases per 100,000, the researchers report in this week’s issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

They found that the protective effect occurred in people who drank one to two cups of coffee a day and increased at three to four cups. They were unable to compare the effect of regular and decaffeinated coffee, however, because decaf is rarely consumed in Japan.

It’s the caffeine in coffee that makes some people nervous and it has been shown in other studies to prompt mental alertness in many people. Some studies have suggested caffeine aggravates symptoms of menopause or intensifies the side effects of some antibiotics. Heavy caffeine use has been linked to miscarriage. But studies have also shown that a skin cream spiked with caffeine lowers the risk of skin cancer in mice.

“It’s an excellent, interesting and provocative study and their conclusions seem justified,” commented Dr. R. Palmer Beasley of the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.

“It will provoke a lot of new work here,” said Beasley, who was not part of the research group.

Reason for effect unclear
While the study found a statistically significant relationship between drinking coffee and having less liver cancer, the authors note that it needs to be repeated in other groups.

And the reason for the reduction remains unclear.

However, Inoue’s team noted that coffee contains large amounts of antioxidants and several animal studies have indicated those compounds have the potential to inhibit cancer in the liver.

In their study, the team also looked at green tea, which contains different antioxidants, and they found no association between drinking the tea and liver cancer rates.

“Other unidentified substances may also be responsible” for the reduction in cancers, they said.

A separate study reported in the same issue of the journal reported no relationship between drinking caffeinated coffee or tea and the rates of colon or rectal cancer.

However, that analysis did find a 52 percent decline in rectal cancer among people who regularly drank two or more cups of decaffeinated coffee.

In that study a team led by Karin B. Michels of Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston analyzed data from two large studies — the Nurses’ Health Study of women and the Health Professionals’ Follow-up Study involving men. The analysis of nearly 2 million person years found 1,438 cases of colorectal cancer.

While they did not find any association between cancer rates and consumption of caffeinated coffee or tea, people who regularly drank two or more cups per day of decaffeinated coffee had about half the incidence of rectal cancer as those who never drank decaf.

The rate of rectal cancer was 12 cases per 100,000 person-years among those who consumed two or more cups of decaffeinated coffee per day. For those who never drank decaffeinated coffee, the rate was 19 cases per 100,000 person-years.

That difference may, however, be due to differences in lifestyle, the researchers commented, suggesting that drinkers of decaffeinated coffee might be more health conscious overall.

The Japanese study was funded by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare of Japan. The U.S. study was funded by the National Institutes of Health.
© 2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.



Coffee may lower breast cancer risk for some women

Women with BRCA1 gene mutations, which confer a high risk of developing breast cancer, might decrease their risk by drinking a lot of coffee, according to a multicenter team of investigators.

Dr. Steven A. Narod, of the University of Toronto, Ontario, and colleagues examined the association between coffee consumption and the risk of breast cancer among 1690 high-risk women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations.

The study included women from 40 clinical centers in four countries. A self-administered questionnaire was used to assess the average lifetime coffee consumption.

The likelihood of developing breast cancer among BRCA mutation carriers who drank 1 to 3 cups of coffee daily, 4 to 5 cups, or 6 or more cups was reduced by 10 percent, 25 percent and 69 percent, respectively, compared to those who drank no coffee, according to the report in the International Journal of Cancer.

When the investigators classified the women by mutation status, they found significant protection from coffee for women with a BRCA1 mutation, but not for carriers of a BRCA2 mutation.

The investigators note that coffee is an important source of phytoestrogens, which may have protective effects.

"The mechanism by which phytoestrogens may beneficially influence the risk of breast cancer has predominantly been attributed to their structural
similarity to endogenous estrogens and their ability to bind to estrogen receptors," Narod and colleagues explain.




Coffee a top source of healthy antioxidants

WASHINGTON - When the Ink Spots sang “I love the java jive and it loves me” in 1940, they could not have known how right they were.

Coffee not only helps clear the mind and perk up the energy, it also provides more healthful antioxidants than any other food or beverage in the American diet, according to a study released Sunday.

Of course, too much coffee can make people jittery and even raise cholesterol levels, so food experts stress moderation.


The findings by Joe A. Vinson, a chemistry professor at the University of Scranton, in Pennsylvania, give a healthy boost to the warming beverage.

“The point is, people are getting the most antioxidants from beverages, as opposed to what you might think,” Vinson said in a telephone interview.

Antioxidants, which are thought to help battle cancer and provide other health benefits, are abundant in grains, tomatoes and many other fruits and vegetables.

Vinson said he was researching tea and cocoa and other foods and decided to study coffee, too.

His team analyzed the antioxidant content of more than 100 different food items, including vegetables, fruits, nuts, spices, oils and common beverages. They then used Agriculture Department data on typical food consumption patterns to calculate how much antioxidant each food contributes to a person’s diet.

They concluded that the average adult consumes 1,299 milligrams of antioxidants daily from coffee. The closest competitor was tea at 294 milligrams. Rounding out the top five sources were bananas, 76 milligrams; dry beans, 72 milligrams; and corn, 48 milligrams. According to the Agriculture Department, the typical adult American drinks 1.64 cups of coffee daily.

That does not mean coffee is a substitute for fruit and vegetables.

“Unfortunately, consumers are still not eating enough fruits and vegetables, which are better for you from an overall nutritional point of view due to their higher content of vitamins, minerals and fiber,” Vinson said.

Dates, cranberries, red grapes

Dates, cranberries and red grapes are among the leading fruit sources of antioxidants, he said.

The antioxidants in coffee are known as polyphenols. Sometimes they are bound to a sugar molecule, which covers up the antioxidant group, Vinson said.

The first step in measuring them was to break that sugar link. He noted that chemicals in the stomach do the same thing, freeing the polyphenols.

“We think that antioxidants can be good for you in a number of ways,” including affecting enzymes and genes, though more research is needed, Vinson said.

“If I say more coffee is better, then I would have to tell you to spread it out to keep the levels of antioxidants up,” Vinson said. “We always talk about moderation in anything.”

His findings were released in conjunction with the annual convention of the American Chemical Society in Washington.

In February, a team of Japanese researchers reported in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute that people who drank coffee daily, or nearly every day, had half the liver cancer risk of those who never drank it. The protective effect occurred in people who drank one to two cups a day and increased at three to four cups.

Diabetes risk
Last year, researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health found that drinking coffee cut the risk of developing the most common form of diabetes.

Men who drank more than six 8-ounce cups of caffeinated coffee per day lowered their risk of type 2 diabetes by about half, and women reduced their risk by nearly 30 percent, compared with people who did not drink coffee, according to the study in Annals of Internal Medicine.

Bonnie Liebman, nutrition director of the Center for Science in the Public Interest, said she was not surprised by Vinson’s finding, because tea has been known to contain antioxidants.

But Liebman, who was not part of Vinson’s research team, cautioned that while many people have faith that antioxidants will reduce the risk of cancer, heart disease and more, the evidence has not always panned out. Most experts are looking beyond antioxidants to the combination of vitamins, minerals other nutrition in specific foods, she said.
© 2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

March 11, 2009

Types of Coffee

Telling one type of coffee from another is part art, part science...and just like tasting wine or chocolate, there's no one right answer. It's all about what YOU like.

This guide will help you learn the difference between the types of coffee you're likely to come across when you visit Scooters Coffeehouse in Shawnee, KS.

* Columbian Supremo - Low levels of acid, rich in body and flavor (Not to be confused with plain old Columbian)
* Brazillian Santo - Bright flavor, Clean Crisp finish
* Costa Rican Tarrazu - Full bodied and sweet with hearty richness and lively acidity



* Mexican High Grown - light bodied, nutty with a chocolate tang and acidic snap
* Panama - Sweet, bright and balanced
* Sumatra - Herbal aroma, full body, low acidity, rich and smooth flavor
* Mokha Java - More acidic and lighter body, quick to finish
* Papua New Guinea - Fruity aroma, earthy body (less full bodied than Sumatra)
* Ethiopian Yirgacheffe - Fruity aroma, light and elegant body, a taste almost like menthol (Southern Ethiopian)
* Kenya AA - Tremendous body, winy acidity, and a black currant flavor
* Jamaican Blue - Nutty aromoa, bright acidity, and a unique beef boullion flavor.
* Hawaiian Kona - Bright and sweet, medium body and flavor

March 10, 2009

Maui Wowi - Franchise Opportunity


Maui Wowi

Serving Fresh Hawaiian blends including Fresh Fruit smoothies, Hawaiian Coffee/Expresso-based beverages, Smoothie Rip-Sticks, Hawaiian Springs Water, Low Carb Smoothies, and EAS Supplements.

Maui Wowi Franchise TrailerMaui Wowi is the number one largest smoothie/espresso franchise in the world. With 24/7 support & extensive training, Maui Wowi offers a simple, profitable and flexible business model. Maui Wowi has thousands of locations and events throughout the country waiting for a Maui Wowi franchise operator. Because of our flexibility, low investment, and variety of business models, Maui Wowi is one of the fastest growing franchises in the world.



* #178 in the Entrepreneur 500 (2004), Maui Wowi is largest Hawaiian-Beverages franchise in the world.
* #33 in Entrepreneur’s Top 101 Franchises (2004) as the fastest home based Franchise in the world.
* #219 Inc. 500’s America’s Fastest Growing Private Companies (2004).

Featured on CNN: “People in the News” August 2003 and on Bloomberg. We owe this honor to developing new product lines and improving the system in response to our franchise owners' requests. We couldn't have done it without them.

Maui Wowi offers you the opportunity to join in the smoothie and coffee revolution and enjoy an escape from typical careers. The popularity of smoothie and coffee increases daily as people want a healthy, delicious, gourmet alternative to typical drinks, snacks, and desserts. Maui Wowi allows franchise owners a great quality of life enjoying a flexible, successful and fun lifestyle. Are you ready to join us?
Quality of Life

Maui Wowi allows you to build a business that fits your lifestyle. Maui Wowi is the perfect low-investment, low-risk business to build wealth while spending time with your family, traveling, or pursuing your dreams! As a Maui Wowi business owner, you can run the show yourself or you can manage the managers. You have the option of working full-time, part-time, from home or hands-on, build your business fast or slow, and enjoy what's important to you!

Location: A great benefit of owning a Maui Wowi business is the flexibility that it will grant you. You have the options from a double drive-thru, store front, in-line store front, build-outs, trailer, cart kiosk and more. You can leave your kiosk in one location, or move it every weekend. Maui Wowi's are successful in malls and office settings, as well as in stadiums, health clubs, at fairs, concerts, and various events. With complete flexibility, you are ensured success.

The Bottom Line: Over the last 22 years, Maui Wowi has created the perfect recipe for success. We took the highest margin, most profitable products, and built a business with low investment, unparalleled flexibility, professionalism, and minimal risk. Add in fun and creativity and you have one of the most profitable business models available today.

Franchise Facts

Established: 1983
Franchised: 1997
US Franchises: 286
International: 0

Franchise Fee: $27,500
Cash Required: $70,000
Total Investment:
$65,000 - $250,000

Training Provided: 4 days at headquarters

Nestle TollHouse Cafe


Nestle TollHouse Cafe

The Nestlé Toll House Cafe by Chip Cookie franchise offers individuals the opportunity to go into business for themselves, but not by themselves.

The Nestlé® Toll House® tradition began back in the 1930's at the Toll House Inn near Boston, Mass., where proprietor Ruth Wakefield became known for the rich, indulgent desserts she baked for weary travelers.

While experimenting one day, she chopped up a bar of Nestlé Semi-Sweet Chocolate into tiny bits and added them to her cookie dough. Instead of melting through the cookie as she expected, the chocolate bits retained their shape, softening to a delicately cream texture. The Toll House Cookie was born and quickly became a favorite.

Today we are pleased to bring you this legendary cookie and other delicious Nestlé Toll House treats fresh from our oven.

Why Nestle® Toll House® by Chip?


* Nestlé is the world's largest food company with products available in nearly every country around the world.
* Nestlé Semi-Sweet Chocolate Morsels are the original "chocolate chip" and are the best selling chocolate chips in America...
* Nescafé is the world's largest coffee brand worldwide.
* Nestlé was listed, in The New York Times, as one of the 100 most powerful brands of the 20th century.

What We Offer
The Nestlé Toll House Cafe by Chip¨ franchise offers individuals the opportunity to go into business for themselves, but not by themselves. Our team members coach Franchisees through the initial stages of site selection all the way through the grand opening of their store! Continued support and guidance throughout the term of the Franchise Agreement are standard protocol for Nestlé Toll House Cafe by Chip.



Nestlé Toll House Cafe by Chip provides a system of support that is mapped out in our Franchisee Operations Manual. The Manual includes a comprehensive training program, proven methods for store operations and procedures documented for use in our Operations Manual. We also offer a dedicated staff for ongoing assistance, and a structured organization adaptable for change as the system requires.

Site Selection
Each franchise is provided with written site selection guidelines and site selection assistance. In addition, we may provide on-site evaluations.

Training
Nestlé Toll House Cafe by Chip's highly structured training program was developed to provide Franchisees with the tools they need to be successful! Trainees will return from our comprehensive full-training program with new skills and the management knowledge it takes to be a Nestlé Toll House Cafe by Chip Franchisee!

Franchise Facts

Established: 2000
Franchised: 2000
US Franchises: 25
International:

Franchise Fee: $25,000
Cash Required: $250,000
Total Investment:
$177,000 - $313,000

Training Provided: Yes

March 9, 2009

Coffee: The New Health Food?

Plenty of health benefits are brewing in America's beloved beverage.
By Sid Kirchheimer
WebMD Feature

Want a drug that could lower your risk of diabetes, Parkinson's disease, and colon cancer? That could lift your mood and treat headaches? That could lower your risk of cavities?

If it sounds too good to be true, think again.




Coffee, the much maligned but undoubtedly beloved beverage, just made headlines for possibly cutting the risk of the latest disease epidemic, type 2 diabetes. And the real news seems to be that the more you drink, the better.
Reducing Disease Risk

After analyzing data on 126,000 people for as long as 18 years, Harvard researchers calculate that compared with not partaking in America's favorite morning drink, downing one to three cups of caffeinated coffee daily can reduce diabetes risk by single digits. But having six cups or more each day slashed men's risk by 54% and women's by 30% over java avoiders.

Though the scientists give the customary "more research is needed" before they recommend you do overtime at Starbuck's to specifically prevent diabetes, their findings are very similar to those in a less-publicized Dutch study. And perhaps more importantly, it's the latest of hundreds of studies suggesting that coffee may be something of a health food -- especially in higher amounts.

In recent decades, some 19,000 studies have been done examining coffee's impact on health. And for the most part, their results are as pleasing as a gulp of freshly brewed Breakfast Blend for the 108 million Americans who routinely enjoy this traditionally morning -- and increasingly daylong -- ritual. In practical terms, regular coffee drinkers include the majority of U.S. adults and a growing number of children.

"Overall, the research shows that coffee is far more healthful than it is harmful," says Tomas DePaulis, PhD, research scientist at Vanderbilt University's Institute for Coffee Studies, which conducts its own medical research and tracks coffee studies from around the world. "For most people, very little bad comes from drinking it, but a lot of good."

Consider this: At least six studies indicate that people who drink coffee on a regular basis are up to 80% less likely to develop Parkinson's, with three showing the more they drink, the lower the risk. Other research shows that compared to not drinking coffee, at least two cups daily can translate to a 25% reduced risk of colon cancer, an 80% drop in liver cirrhosis risk, and nearly half the risk of gallstones.

Coffee even offsets some of the damage caused by other vices, some research indicates. "People who smoke and are heavy drinkers have less heart disease and liver damage when they regularly consume large amounts of coffee compared to those who don't," says DePaulis.

There's also some evidence that coffee may help manage asthma and even control attacks when medication is unavailable, stop a headache, boost mood, and even prevent cavities.

Is it the caffeine? The oodles of antioxidants in coffee beans, some of which become especially potent during the roasting process? Even other mysterious properties that warrant this intensive study?

Actually, yes.

Some of coffee's reported benefits are a direct result of its higher caffeine content: An eight ounce cup of drip-brewed coffee contains about 85 mg -- about three and a half times more than the same serving of tea or cola or one ounce of chocolate.

"The evidence is very strong that regular coffee consumption reduces risk of Parkinson's disease and for that, it's directly related to caffeine," DePaulis tells WebMD. "In fact, Parkinson's drugs are now being developed that contain a derivative of caffeine based on this evidence."

Caffeine is also what helps in treating asthma and headaches. Though not widely publicized, a single dose of pain reliever such as Anacin or Excedrin contains up to 120 milligrams -- what's in a hefty mug o' Joe.
Boost to Athleticism

It's also caffeine -- and not coffee, per se -- that makes java a powerful aid in enhancing athletic endurance and performance, says physiologist and longtime coffee researcher Terry Graham, PhD, of the University of Guelph in Canada. So powerful, in fact, that until recently, caffeine in coffee or other forms was deemed a "controlled" substance by the Olympic Games Committee, meaning that it could be consumed only in small, designated amounts by competing athletes.

"What caffeine likely does is stimulate the brain and nervous system to do things differently," he tells WebMD. "That may include signaling you to ignore fatigue or recruit extra units of muscle for intense athletic performance. Caffeine may even have a direct effect on muscles themselves, causing them to produce a stronger contraction. But what's amazing about it is that unlike some performance-enhancing manipulation some athletes do that are specific for strength or sprinting or endurance, studies show that caffeine positively enhances all of these things."

How does this brew affect growing minds and bodies? Very nicely, it seems, says DePaulis. Coffee, as you probably know, makes you more alert, which can boost concentration. But claims that it improves a child's academic performance can be exaggerated. Coffee-drinking kids may do better on school tests because they're more awake, but most task-to-task lab studies suggest that coffee doesn't really improve mental performance, says DePaulis.

But it helps kids' minds in another way. "There recently was a study from Brazil finding that children who drink coffee with milk each day are less likely to have depression than other children," he tells WebMD. "In fact, no studies show that coffee in reasonable amounts is in any way harmful to children."

On the flip side, it's clear that coffee isn't for everyone. Its legendary jolt in excess doses -- that is, more than whatever your individual body can tolerate -- can increase nervousness, hand trembling, and cause rapid heartbeat. Coffee may also raise cholesterol levels in some people and may contribute to artery clogging. But most recent large studies show no significant adverse effects on most healthy people, although pregnant women, heart patients, and those at risk for osteoporosis may still be advised to limit or avoid coffee.

The bottom line: "People who already drink a lot of coffee don't have to feel 'guilty' as long as coffee does not affect their daily life," says Hu. "They may actually benefit from coffee habits in the long run."

In other words, consume enough caffeine -- whether it's from coffee or another source -- and you will likely run faster, last longer and be stronger. What's enough? As little as one cup can offer some benefit, but the real impact comes from at least two mugs, says Graham. By comparison, it'd take at least eight glasses of cola to get the same effect, which isn't exactly conducive for running a marathon.

But the harder you exercise, the more benefit you may get from coffee. "Unfortunately, where you see the enhancing effects from caffeine is in hard-working athletes, who are able to work longer and somewhat harder," says Graham, who has studied the effects of caffeine and coffee for nearly two decades. "If you a recreational athlete who is working out to reduce weight or just feel better, you're not pushing yourself hard enough to get an athletic benefit from coffee or other caffeinated products."

But you can get other benefits from coffee that have nothing to do with caffeine. "Coffee is loaded with antioxidants, including a group of compounds called quinines that when administered to lab rats, increases their insulin sensitivity" he tells WebMD. This increased sensitivity improves the body's response to insulin.

That may explain why in that new Harvard study, those drinking decaf coffee but not tea beverages also showed a reduced diabetes risk, though it was half as much as those drinking caffeinated coffee.

"We don't know exactly why coffee is beneficial for diabetes," lead researcher Frank Hu, MD, tells WebMD. "It is possible that both caffeine and other compounds play important roles. Coffee has large amounts of antioxidants such as chlorogenic acid and tocopherols, and minerals such as magnesium. All these components have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism."

Meanwhile, Italian researchers credit another compound called trigonelline, which gives coffee its aroma and bitter taste, for having both antibacterial and anti-adhesive properties to help prevent dental cavities from forming. There are other theories for other conditions.

March 8, 2009

Does Obama Drink coffee ....everyday ...?


Facts that Obama doesn't drink coffee and found only few pic about Obama drink his coffe , maybe he doesn't drink it regularly, maybe only for special occasion only.

here you can found 50 others Obama fact you might do not know...


• He collects Spider-Man and Conan the Barbarian comics
• He was known as "O'Bomber" at high school for his skill at basketball
• His name means "one who is blessed" in Swahili
• His favourite meal is wife Michelle's shrimp linguini
• He won a Grammy in 2006 for the audio version of his memoir, Dreams From My Father
• He is left-handed – the sixth post-war president to be left-handed
• He has read every Harry Potter book
• He owns a set of red boxing gloves autographed by Muhammad Ali
• He worked in a Baskin-Robbins ice cream shop as a teenager and now can't stand ice cream
• His favourite snacks are chocolate-peanut protein bars
• He ate dog meat, snake meat, and roasted grasshopper while living in Indonesia
• He can speak Spanish
• While on the campaign trail he refused to watch CNN and had sports channels on instead
• His favourite drink is black forest berry iced tea
• He promised Michelle he would quit smoking before running for president – he didn't
• He kept a pet ape called Tata while in Indonesia
• He can bench press an impressive 200lbs
• He was known as Barry until university when he asked to be addressed by his full name
• His favourite book is Moby-Dick by Herman Melville
• He visited Wokingham, Berks, in 1996 for the stag party of his half-sister's fiancé, but left when a stripper arrived
• His desk in his Senate office once belonged to Robert Kennedy
• He and Michelle made $4.2 million (£2.7 million) last year, with much coming from sales of his books
• His favourite films are Casablanca and One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
• He carries a tiny Madonna and child statue and a bracelet belonging to a soldier in Iraq for good luck
• He applied to appear in a black pin-up calendar while at Harvard but was rejected by the all-female committee.
• His favourite music includes Miles Davis, Bob Dylan, Bach and The Fugees
• He took Michelle to see the Spike Lee film Do The Right Thing on their first date
• He enjoys playing Scrabble and poker
• He doesn't drink coffee and rarely drinks alcohol
• He would have liked to have been an architect if he were not a politician
• As a teenager he took drugs including marijuana and cocaine
• His daughters' ambitions are to go to Yale before becoming an actress (Malia, 10) and to sing and dance (Sasha, 7)
• He hates the youth trend for trousers which sag beneath the backside
• He repaid his student loan only four years ago after signing his book deal
• His house in Chicago has four fire places
• Daughter Malia's godmother is Jesse Jackson's daughter Santita
• He says his worst habit is constantly checking his BlackBerry
• He uses an Apple Mac laptop
• He drives a Ford Escape Hybrid, having ditched his gas-guzzling Chrysler 300
• He wears $1,500 (£952) Hart Schaffner Marx suits
• He owns four identical pairs of black size 11 shoes
• He has his hair cut once a week by his Chicago barber, Zariff, who charges $21 (£13)
• His favourite fictional television programmes are Mash and The Wire
• He was given the code name "Renegade" by his Secret Service handlers
• He was nicknamed "Bar" by his late grandmother
• He plans to install a basketball court in the White House grounds
• His favourite artist is Pablo Picasso
• His speciality as a cook is chilli
• He has said many of his friends in Indonesia were "street urchins"
• He keeps on his desk a carving of a wooden hand holding an egg, a Kenyan symbol of the fragility of life
• His late father was a senior economist for the Kenyan government

March 7, 2009

Making Perfect Coffee

Expert Tips - Brewing Coffee
There are several factors that lead to a good cup - it’s not just the espresso machine. Your coffee has to be fresh (ground coffee loses flavour and body quickly), it has to be ground correctly for the extraction method you are using, the correct amount of coffee must be used - too little gives a thin flavour without balance and your equipment must be cleaned regularly. Water quality is important, use filtered water if possible.

That perfect cup in the cafe is due to the fact that the cafe turns its coffee over quickly so it is always fresh and the Barista making the coffee knows how to get the best from the equipment. Now you can too!

Beans
For the perfect cup, use nothing but the best quality Arabica coffee beans. Arabica beans are also known as 'specialty coffee' and 'gourmet coffee'. Bay Coffee Roasters only use carefully selected Arabica beans from the world over.

Water
If you notice any traces of chlorine, iron, or other minerals in your water, use a quality bottled or filtered water. Softened or distilled water should not to be used to brew coffee as they will affect the flavour of the coffee.

For the perfect water temperature, bring the water to a boil and let it cool a few seconds. Known as 'off the boil', the water is between 90 to 95 degrees Celsius. Water any cooler will not capture the full flavour of the beans. Boiling or reheating coffee literally boils away flavour.

Grind
The type of grind depends on the brewing technique: if the water is in contact with the coffee for a long period of time e.g. when using a plunger, the grind should be coarse.
If the water is to be in contact with the coffee for a short period of time e.g. when using a drip filter, the grind should be fine. Be sure your coffee beans are correctly ground for your brewing method.

It's said the best water-to-coffee ratio is 1 tablespoon of ground coffee (2 tablespoons of whole beans) for each 180ml of water.

The Manual Drip

The Manual Drip brewing process consistently produces superior coffee. Use fine ground coffee. Preheat the carafe or cup with hot water. Add coffee to the filter and place it on top of an insulated coffee carafe or cup. Evenly moisten the grounds (with water off the boil). Wait a few seconds, then add water to the top of the filter. (For more flavour let the grounds coat the sides of the filter, and not settle into the middle). Remove filter and stir coffee.

The Auto Drip
The Auto Drip brewing process produces coffee similar to the Manual Drip. Use fine ground coffee. Fill the coffee maker with cold water. Place a filter into the basket. Add 1 tablespoon ground coffee for each 180ml of water. Place coffee and filter into the holder, close lid, and turn on the machine.

Stove Top
Home Espresso coffee can be made either in a stove top espresso maker e.g. Bialetti or in a domestic electric espresso machine.

Use coffee ground medium fine.

When using a stove top always fill the coffee receptacle to the maximum level and firm down. This is because if there is insufficient coffee, or it is not packed, the water will pass through the coffee too quickly and not extract all the flavours. Unless supplied with a spacer it is not possible to use less coffee only the amount of water can be varied.

Add the required amount of water, fill the coffee holder with grounds wipe any grounds from the rim, firm the grounds and assemble the coffee maker.

Place on the stove until the water boils and the coffee is extracted.

Extraction is complete when the pot starts to hiss. Remove from the stove and wait a few seconds before pouring.


The Plunger or French Press

The Plunger or French Press is an excellent method for brewing the darker roasts and blends of beans and producing a full-textured coffee.

Use a medium to coarse grind of coffee. Preheat the pot and plunger with hot water. Add 1 tablespoon coffee for each 180ml cup into the glass cylinder. Slowly pour the water (just off the boil) into the cylinder and stir the grounds. Set the plunger on top of the cylinder and steep 2 to 4 minutes.

Press plunger down slowly (if the plunger does not press down easily, try a slightly coarser grind.) Allow sediment to settle for 30 seconds before pouring.

Home Espresso
If you are lucky enough to have a home espresso machine follow the manufacturer's instructions. Use medium fine ground coffee. Ask us to grind you a sample.

Ideal extraction will produce a full and persistent crema. Little or no crema indicates that the grind is too fine, a full crema that disipates quickly indicates the grind is too coarse. Good coffee is made in a preheated machine in warm cups. Always run some hot water through your machine first.

Source : Baycoffee.com.au

March 6, 2009

When you ordering coffee in your daily life , what kind of coffee did you exactly want ?


Order Like a Pro

Let's face it...ordering coffee can be intimidating the first few times. Here's how to sound like you know what you're doing...even before you really do!
Hot Stuff - The Basics

Hot Coffee drinks come in several different variations.

* Espresso - Often called a "shot", this is a small serving of very strong coffee, and forms the basis of all the other specialty coffee drinks.
* Latte - Espresso with steamed milk and a little bit of foam on top.
* Cappuccino - Espresso with frothed milk on top.
* Espresso Machiatto - Espresso with very little foam.
* Breve - A latte made with half and half rather than milk.
* Cafe au Lait - Steamed milk with brewed coffee (not espresso).
* Mocha - Latte with dark chocolate.
* White Mocha - Latte with white chocolate
* Americano - Espresso with hot water.
* Italiano - Espresso in brewed coffee.
* Steamer - Not really coffee at all, but steamed milk with one of several flavors added. (Kids love 'em.)

Coffee is an energy drink or not....?

Who thinks that coffee and energy drinks actually work and help you stay awake? Lets say you only got 4 hours of sleep and you have to wake up to go to work and then to school and in order to wake up you either drink coffee or an energy drink and do they actually wake you up or not.

Please share your experience with coffee.
Thanks

March 5, 2009

Do you know Starbucks has changed their logo three times since 1970

Starbucks is the largest coffee house retailer in the world today, with over 15,000 stores in over 42 countries. With a Starbucks store at almost every corner, millions of people see the famous Starbucks logo every day.

The distinctive Starbucks logo has achieved broad visual recognition, equal in familiarity to the Starbucks brand name itself. At the same time, a certain mystique surrounds the trademarked image and the unusual mermaid like figure at the center of the logo. What exactly does the mythical looking figure symbolize or represent, and what does it have to do with coffee?




The original logo, conceived in 1971, was fashioned after a 15th century Norse woodcut, the image of a mythical two-tailed mermaid siren. The siren, as you may recall from Greek mythology, was an alluring and irresistible female figure, typically half-fish/half-women (the mermaid variety). The siren's objective was to a seduce the seagoing mariner with a powerful enticing song most often to the unfortunate demise of the susceptible sailor who could not resist temptation.





With a coffee brown color scheme, the circular ring surrounding the mythological mermaid figure contained the text "Starbucks - Coffee - Tea - Spices". The overall image was designed to resemble a cigar band label.

The symbolism of the mermaid siren was not intended to suggest the demise of the customers who bought the coffee, but rather, to represent the irresistible and seductive quality of the coffee itself.

Over the last thirty five years, the logo has undergone several significant changes, while still adhering to the original theme.

The original version remained in use until 1987 when Howard Schultz raised sufficient capital from local investors to purchase Starbucks from the founders for 3.7 million.


Schultz had previously left Starbucks in 1985 to pursue his vision of a European style espresso cafe when he started the Il Giornale coffee house. The Il Giornale logo reflected a theme of speed with the head of Mercury, the swift messenger god of Roman mythology, at the center. The theme of swift speed fit well with espresso. Espresso translates to a "fast and express" coffee in Italian.

After the purchase of Starbucks in 1987, the Starbucks logo was cleaned up a bit, a little more befitting of a new corporate image. The bare breasts were covered up by the mermaids flowing hair, although her belly button was still visible. And the color scheme was changed from a coffee brown in the original logo to the familiar green established by the Il Giornale logo. The text in the surrounding circular band was changed to simply "Starbucks Coffee".


Second Starbucks logo, 1987 to 1992




A third revision of the Starbucks logo in 1992 crops the image of the mermaid with a close-up view. Her navel is no longer visible. The mermaid's tails on either side are mostly obscured which creates some mystery and question for those not familiar with the earlier logo.

Current Starbucks logo


Recently, with the April 2008 introduction of the new Pike Place Roast blend, Starbucks has re-introduced a version of the original logo. While this is not a replacement for the current Starbucks logo, you'ill find this retro-logo on the Pike Place Roast cups, and Pike Place Roast bags of coffee beans.

This new logo version is similar to the cigar motif of the original logo from the 1970’s with a few differences. The phrase around the perimeter of the old logo was “Starbucks - Coffee - Tea - Spices”. The new logo retains the familiar “Starbucks - Fresh Roasted Coffee”. And the bare breasts in the original mermaid image are not covered with her flowing locks of hair.

The marketing objective in bringing back this version of the original logo compliments the campaign slogan "Roasting coffee since 1971. The best cup then. The best cup now”.

Acknowledgement to the DeadProgrammers Blog for the excellent Starbucks logo detective work, and to Brand Autopsy's The Evolution of the Starbucks Logo for additional Starbucks logo research and reference to Howard Schultz's "Pour Your Heart Into It : How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time".

From : gourment-coffee-zone.com

March 4, 2009

Coffee - As a Health Drink?




It is a pity that coffee does not get the credit and the attention it deserves. Coffee tends to get bad press and focus on negative effects of caffeine and we generally underestimate the importance of coffee in our life. Coffee is seen just as a drink, but it actually provides countless health benefits. Coffee may not be in the prescription by a physician. But nevertheless it plays a significant role in ensuring a healthy life for us.

People love coffee. They start their daily routine with a steaming cup of coffee in the early morning. But it is a question whether they really realize the benefits of coffee as a health drink. Coffee stops headache. It boosts your mood. These are the good things about coffee that all of us know. But there are more than what eyes meet in coffee matters.

• Research has shown that coffee minimizes the risk of diabetes.

• Believe it or not, coffee lowers the risk of Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. People who drink coffee regularly are around 80% less likely to be affected by Parkinson's disease than who do not take coffee at all.

• Regular drinking of coffee distances you from colon cancer. Daily two cups of coffee, the risk you may get colon cancer is reduced by 25%.

• Two cups of caffeinated coffee per day, liver cirrhosis risk is decreased by 80%.

• Moderate intake of coffee reduces the risk of developing gallstones.

• Coffee reduces the risk of early stage diabetes. Coffee improves insulin sensitivity and it reduces blood sugar levels. Research has shown that if you drink three cups of caffeinated coffee per day, diabetes risk is reduced by considerable amount. If you drink six cups of caffeinated coffee daily, risk of diabetes is reduced by a whopping 50%.

• Coffee may help ward off asthma. Coffee eases out the nasal passages and improves airflow.

• Coffee contains antioxidants that fight against viral infection. One cup of coffee contains more antioxidants than one cup of grape juice!

• Coffee contains chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, and protocatechnic acid. These chemicals show excellent antibacterial effects.

• Caffeine present in coffee is a psychoactive substance. It improves one's mood and enhances performance.

• Coffee reduces fatigue effectively and it is an active stimulant.

• Around 100 ml of coffee every hour you can stay all night awake. Coffee delays sleep and reduces sleep time.

• Coffee makes you more alert. If you drink coffee whole day you will be alert throughout the day.

• Coffee prevents formation of dental cavities.

But coffee has its downside as well. It is an addictive drink. People who drink coffee daily in the long run become an addict, not just to that smell and taste, but to the caffeine content. They can reach a state where seems impossible for them to function in life without a cup of their favorite coffee and its likable bitter taste. If you make drinking coffee a regular habit, it certainly presents you numerous benefits like improved mood, enhanced performance, and reduction of risks of a lot of diseases including cancer. But what if you cannot drink your coffee at the usual time you take it? You may suffer from a headache. Fatigue reaches you. You feel restless. Your mood becomes dull. Your performance gets affected. If you regularly consume a large amount of coffee and stop drinking it suddenly you may suffer the withdrawal symptoms of caffeine addiction. This results in more adverse effects. Your blood sugar level becomes imbalanced. Your blood pressure gets affected. You may become easily impatient and get easily stressed. If you find this happening to you it is advisable to reduce your regular coffee intake and ease yourself out of your strong caffeine addiction. Limiting your daily intake will reduce your dependence on caffeine.

Though coffee has its own list of health benefits, like anything else, it should be taken only in moderation. Too much coffee has its own downside. So drink your cup of coffee, but only in a moderate amount to ensure a healthy you.



Source : http://www.articlesbase.com/food-and-beverage-articles

$ 100 for just one cup of coffee..?




LONDON, THURSDAY -
ask the British people, what's most expensive coffee in the world, the nation's of tea drinker will answer - Kopi luwak , the coffee that taken from civet dung. This presumption may be the same as the traditional society of Indonesia.

Why are these coffee so expensive ?
In United kingdom the coffee that has been eaten civet (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus) and out again through his pup. Selling price this kind of coffee reach about 50 PoundsSterling , almost 1 million rupiah and if we converted in US its $ 100 per cup, yes per cup , not per box....
what an expensive price ,reported in the Daily Mail's internet site, on Thursday (10 / 4/ 2008).

If you know the the origin of coffee, some coffee lovers will tremble.

But for Peter Jones cafes, that coffee is the most selling coffee in his cafe in Sloane Square that sell espresso, latte and Americano coffee beans. He start to selling to most expensive coffee in april 2008 .

Would you like to know from where Jones get the raw materials that make his cafe famous ?
He purchased 60 packages exclusive mix of Jamaican Blue Mountain Coffee and Kopi luwak from Indonesia. This kind of Coffee beans is rare, because the harvest is less than 200 kg per year.

Believed, mongoose (a wolf in the Javanese language)or in Indonesia they called Luwak can select the best coffee beans based on his instinct. They select seeds and eat the soft, but only the outside that can be digested, while the rest is discarded along with the dirt. Liquid stool that is believed to enrich the taste of coffee mongoose.

Now, customers can feel Jones sensation Kopi luwak.
Meanwhile, all profits from sales will be donated to cancer.

One customer Jones, Hannah Silver (23) said, "I was quite worried before trying, but it turns out that Kopi Luwak was one of the best coffee I ever taste.

Coffee make you addicted...?






Almost all relevant authorities believe that caffeine is not a genuinely addictive product. There are several criteria given as to why caffeine is not considered an addictive substance compared to other beverages, such as alcohol, and many recreational drug substances that are considered to be addictive.

With coffee consumption, there is little or no increased tolerance to dose, so a coffee lover does not need to increase amounts of coffee or caffeine to achieve the effects they enjoy. This means the consumer who likes three cups of coffee today to enjoy the sensations will not need five or six cups to feel the same way in a few years . This is very different from genuinely addictive products such as alcohol and many forms of illegal drugs where regular users will be inclined to increase intake to achieve the same feeling.

Secondly, withdrawal is not genuinely a challenge. Someone who wished to stop drinking coffee could just moderate their consumption downward for several days to stop drinking completely with no effects. Caffeine withdrawal usually only appears amongst a small percentage of regular coffee consumers who abruptly stop their caffeine consumption. They may experience mild headaches, irritability and nervousness from sudden deprivation.

Thirdly, as much fun as can be made of a coffee lover's craving for a cup of coffee, there are no anti-social behaviours linked to caffeine consumption.

If for any reason you are advised to stop or reduce your caffeine intake, just reduce consumption gradually to the desired level, or to no intake at all

http://www.coffeeandhealth.ca/caffeine.htm

March 3, 2009

Kelly's Coffee & Fudge Factory - Coffee Franchise




Kelly's Coffee & Fudge Factory blends the rapidly expanding market of specialty coffee retailing with an extensive menu of freshly baked pastries, sandwiches, salads, and home-style fudge, which appeals to the entire family.

A sound year-round business opportunity.

Everything is manufactured daily on the premises to ensure freshness of product. Specialty coffees and specialty frozen drinks such as Mocha Freeze creates a year round draw for business.

The high-quality product assortment includes gourmet coffee drinks (hot, cold or frozen), specialty teas, a wide variety of fudge, baked goods, homemade candies, caramel apples and Rice Krispies Treats. Everything is manufactured daily on the premises to ensure freshness.

Kelly's coffees are of the highest grade (species Arabica AA&A), with the customer's order filled directly from the roaster to produce the freshest coffee available. The company also offers complete coffee brewing accessories, espresso pots, filers, grinders, cups and other paraphernalia, as well as a selection of bulk (loose) and stash (bags) teas.


Franchise Concepts


The franchise development process for Kelly's Coffee & Fudge includes a comprehensive support program beginning with real estate selection and design and concept of store. Kelly's real estate department assists with location availability and site selection. We also provide management, staff and operations training for a successful operation.

At the outset, estimated start-up fees range from $200,000 to $250,000 including franchise fee, equipment, initial supplies, deposits, insurance, leasehold improvements, architectural engineering, and initial working capital. Kelly's Franchise Operations Department will provide you with assistance researching and launching your very own Kelly's store.


Percolating for Growth, Some Site Requirements

Optimum site sizes range from 800 to 1,400 square feet. Potential sites include freestanding facilities, end caps, and pads. Also, in-line space within exceptionally well located entertainment centers, power centers, community centers,neighborhood shopping centers and malls should be considered.


Franchise Facts

Established: 1983
Franchised: 1983
US Franchises: 42
International: 1

Franchise Fee: $20,000
Cash Required: $150,000
Total Investment:
$200,000 - $300,000

Training Provided: 1 Week at HQ and 1 Week during Opening.

request info: http://www.dreamfranchises.com

Starbucks Coffee Franchise....?


Starbucks Franchise Facts

It's funny that among all the industry related searches among search engines like Google and Yahoo, the search for "Starbucks Franchise" is among the most popular. Yes thousands of people each month for one reason or another go looking for a "starbucks franchise" online.

We get this question all the time "How Much Does a Starbucks Franchise Cost?



Maybe they're looking after the Starbucks Success story around the world

However , bad news java fans, Starbucks is not a franchise!

I quote the Stabucks.com FAQ below:

Q: Does Starbucks Franchise?
A: No, Starbucks does not franchise to individuals. However, in situations in which a master concessionaire or other company controls or can provide improved access to desirable retail space (such as an airport), the Company may consider licensing its operations to such a company.

Coffee Hair Rinse




This short tips will make your hair shiny

(for brunettes and redheads)

* 8 cups warm brewed coffee

After shampooing rinse hair with coffee. Do not rinse it out. Your hair will be rich and shiny.

don't forget, no sugar Please... and no creamer

Benefits of Coffee




Researchers from the University of Scranton released on August 29, 2005 that coffee is the No. 1 source of antioxidants in the American diet. Black tea is the second. Antioxidants are substances or nutrients in foods that can prevent or slow oxidative damage to our body. When our cells utilize oxygen, they naturally produce free radicals (by-products) which can cause damage to other cells. Antioxidants act as "free radical scavengers" and hence prevent and repair damage inflicted by these free radicals. Fruits and vegetables are hailed as the richest sources of antioxidants, but this study shows that coffee is the main source from which most Americans get their antioxidants. Both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee appear to provide similar amounts of antioxidants.

By Gloria Tsang
http://www.healthcastle.com/coffee.shtml

World’s Rarest Coffee Brews - Norwegian Egg Coffee

To most people, it is quite unusual to brew coffee with an egg in it. However, this is a traditional Norwegian method for making coffee.

How to make it? First, you have to break a single
egg and mix the egg with a half a cup of water (about 120 ml) in a slow heated saucepan. Then, add a cup of ground coffee with six cups of boiling water (about 1.5 liter) and leave it to boil in slow heat for about 3-4 minutes. After that, add a half cup of very cold water and let it steep for another 9 minutes before serving.

I bet you would expect a coffee with a mixture of egg floating in it. What's unusual about this coffee is that, you will get a rich, clear coffee. This is due to the fact that the egg protein binds with the ground coffee and it settles the grounds, providing the coffee with the richness in its taste. This is when a half cup of very cold water is added suddenly to the mixture.

Note that there are many variations in making the Norwegian Egg Coffee. Some people may even use the egg together with the shell (broken up). In this case, the coffee must be carefully strained to remove pieces of egg shell. Some people may use only the egg whites. In any cases, whichever method you use, the result will still be the same, i.e. clear and rich coffee.


by sher d fly

World’s Rarest Coffee Brews - Reishi Coffee




“Reishi” means red mushrooms in Japanese. Coffee blend which include Reishi is normally consumed for the maintenance of health and general well-being. This healthy drink has been commercialized by a number of companies and has increasingly becomes common now. However, the ones produced under an American brand called ReishiGo is quite unusual.

This special blend of Reishi coffee contains the whole Reishi mushroom including the fruit body, cracked spores, and mycelium, which claims to be more potent in terms of de-oxidation and efficacy. Actually you can see the said mushroom floating in the coffee.

by Sher d.Fly

Barista..........??? mm mm mm don't know what is this about...



Barrista....?

What is this.,
kind of thing ? product, brand or profession

What is the different with Barrister...?


If you were to visit a bar or coffeeshop in Italy, you might very well encounter a uniformed bartender called a barista. In Italy, a barista is a trained mixologist familiar with both alcohol and coffee-based drinks. He or she might even wear an elaborate jacket similar to that of a bandmaster or military officer. A barista is usually treated as a respected specialist, in the same vein as a wine steward or sommelier.

When the gourmet coffee industry exploded onto the scene during the 1980s and 1990s, however, the term barista took on a slightly different meaning. A barista in the coffeehouse sense is an expert in producing espresso and espresso-based drinks. Expresso is an intensely-flavored form of coffee generally served in a small cup called a demitasse. In order to brew a perfect cup of espresso, a barista must place a measured amount of ground coffee into a wire basket and tamp it down firmly. The wire basket is then locked under the spout of an espresso machine.

A trained barista should know precisely how much hot water should be forced through the mesh and for how long. If the time is too short, the espresso will be weak and watery. If the barista spends too much time, the espresso will be too strong to drink. It is this intimate knowledge of an espresso machine's capabilities that make a good barista indispensable to a coffeeshop. A barista may also have to create a good froth from steamed milk or allow the espresso to form a natural dark layer on top called a crema.



The skills of a barista go beyond being a good coffee maker. In some coffeeshops, a barista is also expected to have a working knowledge of all of the different blends of gourmet coffees offered. Customers may also ask a barista about roasting times or which grinder settings work best. A good barista also learns different garnishing techniques, such as creating signature designs with stir sticks and cream. There are national and international barista competitions which put all of these skills to the ultimate test.


Oh almost forgot..so what is barrister...?
from Wikipedia..A barrister is a lawyer found in many common law jurisdictions that employ a split profession in relation to legal representation

March 2, 2009

How much caffeine consumed from your coffee drink




The majority of all caffeine consumed worldwide comes from coffee—in some countries, this figure is as high as 85%.

Depending on the type of coffee and method of preparation, the caffeine content of a single serving can vary greatly. On average, the following amounts of caffeine can be expected in a single cup of coffee—about 207 milliliters (7 fluid ounces)—or single shot of espresso—about 44–59 mL (1.5–2 fl oz)

Drip coffee: 115–175 mg
Espresso: 100 mg
Brewed: 80–135 mg
Instant: 65–100 mg
Decaf, brewed: 3–4 mg
Decaf, instant: 2–3 mg


Taken from www.coffeefacts.com

March 1, 2009

Vietnamese drip coffee - Ca phe phin:




My coffee-aficionado friend has had plenty of ca phe sua da or Vietnamese iced coffee before, but he was particularly intrigued with this old-school method of using a phin or metal coffee filter for ca phe phin, Vietnamese drip coffee. You can find it at restaurants in Little Saigon but they're increasingly switching over to pre-made iced coffees. It's really easy to do it yourself at home, just takes a bit o' patience.


You can buy the phin or metal filter at most Little Saigon supermarkets for under $3.

It comes with three pieces, clockwise, from left to right: The filter, the lid and the press (the flat disc with a metal rod coming out of it).

First, pour some condensed milk into a glass. Pick a clear glass if you're a nerd like me and like watching the coffee action. I usually go with several tablespoons as it helps to cut the super potent and dark roast Vietnamese coffee, but you can always add more later.

You can also pick up a bag of dark roast coffee grounds at most Vietnamese markets, typically at the cash register. My folks go to Vien Dong Supermarket in Garden Grove for their ca phe. About $5 a bag.

Put a kettle of water on to boil. Then, before you put the coffee grounds into the filter, be sure to take out the press. Add a few spoonfuls of coffee grounds into the filter until it's almost halfway full for a strong serving. (Or roughly three teaspoons.) Place the press back into the filter and screw the rod back into place if need be. (Erik did a great job his first time -- betcha thought those large hands were mine, huh?)

Then pour the boiling water into the filter to the top. Cover with the lid and wait about 15 minutes or so.

The coffee will start drip, drip, dripping ... be patient ... after the water goes down, you'll likely want to add one more round of hot water.

Then you just stir up the condensed milk and coffee together and either drink it hot or add ice. And some more condensed milk if need be. Enjoy! your delightful cup of Vietnamese Coffee

Taken from

World rarest and unique Coffee brew - Cold Brew Coffee




The notion of cold-brewed coffee sounded to us, frankly, weird, to most people, brewing coffee minus the heat is quite impossible
After all, heat seems intrinsic to the coffee process. Why would you possibly want to leave grounds soaking for half a day in an ugly plastic pitcher, like so much Kool-Aid? There's only one possible reason we were willing to try the Toddy coffee system, one of a handful of cold-brew options available: It works.

In the beginning
The idea of commercializing the method of brewing coffee without the heat or cold brewing came from a chemical engineer, Todd Simpson. It is said that in 1964 he got the idea in a small café in Guatemala. This is when he received a small flask of cool concentrate and some boiling water upon ordering. This makes him wonder whether his mother, who couldn't stomach coffee, might be able to enjoy the cold coffee instead. Eventually his mother could and this leads him to develop the cold brewing device known as the “Toddy system” which is being commercialized now.
Todd Simpson believes that it may be an ancient Peruvian method, and coffee concentrates first showed up in 19th-century America. Another theory traces it back to Java. However, nobody knows for sure where cold coffee brewing method came from.
No heat, no plug
It's not an immediately comfortable transition. The technology is profoundly low-tech: a plastic pitcher with a fabric filter, sitting atop a carafe that catches the finished product. No electricity needed, just gravity, a pound of ground beans and nine cups of cold water. That and 10 to 12 hours steeping time.
It is said that the coffee produced through this method is less acidic, less caffeine and also friendly to sensitive stomach. Toddy claims to brew up two-thirds less caffeine than regular coffee; in a side-by side test using Starbucks' regular blend, the Toddy version had a pH of 6.31 and 40 mg of caffeine per 100 grams of coffee, while Starbucks store-brewed clocked in at a pH of 5.48 and 61 mg of caffeine. (Lower numbers on the pH scale, which is measured logarithmically, denote more acid.)

March 29, 2009

J-lo loves starbucks


Jennifer Lopez drinks a Starbucks coffee as she leaves a Los Angeles store after shopping on Saturday (04.22.06). Later that evening Lopez and her husband Marc Anthony attended a reception to raise money for Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton's re-election campaign in Beverly Hills.





March 25, 2009

Jamie Pressly's Son Addicted to Coffee

Jaime Pressly says her 16-month-old son is addicted to Cuban coffee. The "My Name is Earl" star--who is engaged to DJ Eric Calvo--admits Dezi can't get enough of the caffeinated drink. She said,My kid is really loud. He is just like 'MOMMY' all the time. And I'll be standing right next to him. He means no harm. He just wants a cup of Cuban coffee!



aime also revealed her son's addiction is being encouraged by Cuban-born Eric, who is better known by his professional name Eric Cubiche. She added, You think when Eric and Dezi are speaking to each other in Spanish they're mad, but they're really just saying, 'Hey, do you want to go get a cup of coffee?

The 31-year-old actress added she was surprised that Devi didnt inherit his fathers dark skin. She said, Eric is very, very, very dark. He's Cuban with an olive complexion. Dezi came out looking like me. It's pretty crazy! Although he does tan really well!

Taken from : Showbiz.com

March 24, 2009

Katie Holmes Keeps Coffee Close




After rehearsals for her new Broadway play, Katie Holmes carries her trusty coffee container while bringing back the “pegged jeans” look in New York City on Thursday.

The 29-year-old Dawson’s Creek actress’ husband Tom Cruise has been named in a $250 million Scientology lawsuit filed by a former member. The lawsuit accuses the leaders of the faith of harassment. Mr. Cruise is reportedly second in line to the Scientology head David Miscavage.



March 13, 2009

Caribbean hot Coffee drinks

1 coconut
2 cups milk
4 cups strong coffee
1 tablespoon sugar

1. Punch two holes in to coconut, pour liquid into saucepan
2. Bake coconut for 30 minutes at 300 F degrees
3. Break open coconut, remove meat, and grate.
4. Mix coconut meat, coconut liquid, and milk in a sauce pan
5. Heat over low heat until creamy.
6. Strain
7. Toast grated coconut under broiler
8. Mix milk mixture, coffee, and sugar
9. Pour into mugs, garnish with toasted coconut.





Nogged Coffee Drinks

1 cup coffee
1 egg yolk
1/2 cup cream
dash nutmeg

1. Beat sugar and egg yolk together
2. Place cream into sauce pan, and heat over low setting
3. Whisk in egg mixture
4. Heat to 200 F degrees
5. Pour coffee into to cups, and top with cream mixture
6. garnish with nutmeg





Mexican Mocha - Coffee drinks

1 1/2 cups strong coffee
4 teaspoons chocolate syrup
3/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1 tablespoon sugar
1/2 cup whipping cream

1. Put 1 teaspoon of chocolate syrup into each cup
2. Mix Whipping cream, 1/4 teaspoon of the cinnamon, nutmeg, and sugar.
3. Whip until you have soft peaks
4. Place the last 1/2 teaspoon of cinnamon into coffee, and stir
5. Pour coffee into cups, stir to mix in chocolate syrup
6. Top with whipped cream mixture.





Cafe Borgia Hot Coffee

for 4 servings


2 cups strong Italian coffee
2 cups hot chocolate
whipped cream
grated orange peel (garnish)
1. Mix coffee and hot chocolate
2. Pour into mugs
3. Top with whipped cream and orange peel





Coffee as a Spiritual Sacrament

Coffee has a long history as spiritual substance. Frederick Wellman, in Coffee: Botany, Cultivation, and Utilization, describes an African blood-brother ceremony in which "blood of the two pledging parties is mixed and put between the twin seeds of a coffee fruit and the whole swallowed."


Coffee in its modern form, as a hot, black beverage, was first used as a medicine, next as an aid to prayer and meditation by Arabian monastics, much as green tea is used by Zen monks in Japan to celebrate and fortify. Pilgrims to Mecca carried coffee all over the Moslem world. It became secularized, but the religious association remained. Some Christians at first were wont to brand coffee as "that blacke bitter invention of Satan," as opposed to good Christian wine, but in the sixteenth century Pope Clement VIII is said to have sampled coffee and given it his official blessing.



Coffee Ceremonies

For people in the Horn of Africa and parts of the Middle East coffee has maintained its religious connotations, and the ritual aspects remain conscious and refined. Ethiopians and Eritreans brought their coffee ceremonies with them as they immigrated to the United States. My first experience with a formal coffee ceremony was in the apartment of an Eritrean friend in a thoroughly urbanized part of Oakland, California.

His wife carefully roasted the green coffee beans in a shallow pan, passed the just-roasted, steaming beans around the room so that everyone could enjoy their sweet black smoke, cooled them on a small straw mat, ground them in an electric grinder (at home in Eritrea she would use a large mortar and pestle, but she explained that the pounding disturbed her downstairs neighbors!), brewed the coffee in a traditional clay pot, and served it in tiny cups. The entire event was an opportunity to talk and gossip while basking in the smell and spectacle of the preparation of the beverage whose consumption consummated the morning.

On a less literal level, a multitude of coffee ceremonies take place simultaneously all over the world: in office lunchrooms, in espresso bars, in Swedish parlors, in Japanese coffeehouses, wherever coffee drinkers gather to stare into space, to read a newspaper, or to share a moment, outside time and obligation, with their friends. Ritual is further wrapped up in the smell and taste of coffee. Certain aromas, flavors, gestures, and sounds combine to symbolize coffee and suggest a mood of contemplation or well-being in an entire culture. This, I am convinced, was the reason for the persistence of the pumping percolator in American culture in the 1940s through 1960s. To Americans of that era, the gentle popping sound of the percolator and the smell the popping liberated signified coffee and made them feel good before they even lifted a cup.

Other cultures have similar associations. To people from the Middle East and parts of Eastern Europe, the froth that gathers in the pot when brewing coffee is an indispensable part of the drink, not only because it tastes good but because it symbolizes the meditative glow that comes with brewing and consuming coffee. Italians put a comparable, if somewhat less ceremonial, emphasis on the froth produced by espresso brewing. An Italian will not take a tazzina of espresso seriously if it is not topped with a layer of what to a filter-coffee drinker may look like gold-colored scum. Yet this golden scum, or crema, is what marks espresso as the real thing. Similar satisfaction resides in the milk froth that tops such drinks as caffè latte and cappuccino. The froth has almost no flavor, but a cappuccino is not a cappuccino without it.



The world wide tradition of coffee

The tradition of the coffeehouse has spread worldwide. Australia is paved with Italian-style caffes and Japan has evolved its kisatens, an elegant interpretation of American 1950s-style coffee shops and coffeehouses. In Great Britain, the espresso-bar craze of the 1950s came and went, but shows vigorous signs of a Starbucks-style comeback. Other parts of Europe and the Middle East have their own ongoing traditions. In Vienna, the home of the first European coffeehouses, the café tradition has undergone a renaissance.


In the United States, the 1930s and 1940s brought the classic diner, and the 1950s and 1960s the vinyl-boothed coffee shop, together with the coffeehouse -- haunt of rebels, poets, beboppers, and beatniks. All of these incarnations are still with us. The classic diner is enjoying a revival, coffee shops still minister to the bottomless cup, and in American cities hundreds of new coffeehouses cater to a fresh generation of rebels, complete with funky furniture, radical posters, jazz, and folksingers.

But the 1970s and 1980s appear to have produced still another North American café tradition. Classic Italian-American caffes of the 1950s, like Caffè Reggio in Manhattan and Caffè Trieste in San Francisco, appear to have influenced the development of a style of café or caffe that takes as its starting point an immigrant's nostalgic vision of the lost and gracious caffes of prewar Italy. From that vision come the light and spacious interiors of the new North American urban café, together with the open seating, the simple and straightforward furnishing, and an atmosphere formal enough to discourage customers from swaggering around and putting their feet on chairs, yet informal enough to mix students doing homework and executives having business meetings. Add an espresso machine and some light new American cuisine, and the latest version of the American café is defined.


The Coffee Ritual

Ritual often chooses for its vehicle consciousness-altering substances such as wine, peyote or coffee. People may assume a bit of God resides in these substances, because through using them they are separated for a moment from the ordinariness of things and can seize their reality more clearly. This is why a ritual is not only a gesture of hospitality and reassurance, but a celebration of a break in routine, a moment when the human drive for survival lets up and people can simply be together. This last aspect is to me the fundamental meaning of the coffee break, the coffee klatch, the happy hour, and the after-dinner coffee. These are secular rituals that, in unobtrusive but essential ways, help maintain humanness in ourselves and with one another.

In many cultures, the ritual aspects of drinking tea or coffee are given semi-religious status. The most famous of such rituals is the Japanese tea ceremony, in which powdered green tea is whipped in a traditional bowl to form a rich frothy drink, then is ceremonially passed, in complete silence, from one participant to the next. The tea ceremony is consciously structured as a communal meditation devoted to contemplating the presence of eternity in the moment. Doubtless the caffeine in the tea aids in such psychic enterprise.

from
coffeereview.com



Six Steps to Great Coffee At Home

Here at Coffee Daily , we aim to provide you with coffee information that is useful and to-the-point. Our six-step guide is here to help you get straight into enjoying coffee making, without wading through exhaustive detail and complex reviews.

As you read through each of the steps, you will find buying tips designed to help you find the right coffee maker or machine for you. You will also find great brewing tips and instructions for each coffee maker. For making great coffee at home, we have all you need to know!

Follow these steps for happy coffee making!...


Step 1 - To Espresso or not to Espresso?:
The first step to choosing your coffee maker is to decide whether you would prefer an espresso machine or other (drip, filter, percolator, etc.). This article helps you decide. The article also covers the "French Press" and "Stovetop Moka Express" for those coffee lovers who prefer not to use a machine.

Step 2 - Manual, Steam, Pump, Automatic or Super-Automatic Espresso Machines?:
If after reading Step 1 you decide that an espresso machine suits you best, the next step is to choose the type of espresso machine. Should it be manual or automatic? Should it use the steam or pump method of extraction? This article helps you decide.

Step 3 - Drip, Filter, Plunger or Combination Coffee Maker?:
If after reading Step 1 you decide that you would prefer one of the other types of coffee maker, the next step is to choose the type (drip, filter, percolator, French press, etc.). This article helps you decide.

Step 4 - Get the Beans:
Once you have invested in your own coffee maker, you will no doubt want to try different styles of beans and roasts. The articles in this section cover all you need to know.

Step 5 - Accessorize:
Accessories for coffee makers, machine and coffee lovers. From milk frothers to cups, mugs and filter paper, these articles will help you choose the right accessory.

Step 6 - Learn More About Coffee:
Once you begin learning about coffee, and indeed enjoying coffee, you will find that there is always more to know - coffee making is a continual learning curve. These articles are provided to help you enjoy that learning curve.



March 12, 2009

Coffee crêpes




Ingredients

4 teaspoonful of instant coffee
200 g of flour
1/4 Kg. of sweetened cream
1/4 litre of milk
4 eggs
2 tablespoons of sugar
1 small glass of rum
50 grs. of flour

Preparation:

In a bowl, mix the flour, the sugar, the eggs, the milk, the rum and 2 teaspoonful of instant coffee.
Melt a little butter in a pan
Pour 3 tablespoons of the mixing and move the pan so as the mixing covers the pan totally.
Turn it
Put the crêpes in a tray
Prepare a cream with 2 teaspoonful of instant coffee, mixed with the cream.
Serve the crêpes with the cream on top.



The Golden Rules of Good Coffee

When it's all said, making a good cup of coffee at home is not a complicated thing. In fact, you only need to remember a small number of fundamental rules to make good coffee. How many of those rules you adhere to is up to you. The more you adhere to, the better the cup of coffee you brew. Adhere to them all, and you make the perfect cup of coffee at home.

It's key to your whole process of making great coffee at home to plan in advance so that you cover each of your bases.


Golden Rule #1: Ground coffee expires at a faster rate than whole coffee beans.
Further to the first Golden Rule, coffee goes stale for as long as it's not kept airtight. In addition ground coffee deteriorates at a different rate than whole coffee beans. Groundd coffee deteriorates at a much faster rate. This even goes for grocery store-bought ground coffee which comes airtight in a vacuum-packed packaging or tin container, but begins to go stale as soon as you break the seal. Most North Americans seem satisfied with the quality of barely air-sealed ground coffee to get them up in the morning and get them through the day. But here, we're talking about good and fresh coffee. Keep coffee beans whole until you're ready to brew them. Then, grind only what you need to grind and brew it. Invest in whole coffee beans from a local retailer. They're worth having for that perfect cup of coffee at home.


Golden Rule #2: Air is the enemy of coffee.
Coffee is perishable, and anything perishable goes stale as much as it's in contact with air. Think about investing in containers designed to be airtight, most commonly ceramic containers with latch-closes and a rubber band squeezed between the lid and container. "Tupperware" containers and sandwich bags are better than leaving coffee in open air, but don't do the same job of keeping air out and keeping coffee from going stale as a container designed to be airtight. Contrary to what many believe, freezing your coffee beans doesn't keep them from going stale. In fact, the humidity from the freshness of coffee beans will congeal and once thawed, evaporate quicker from the beans.


Golden Rule #3: Coffee is mostly water.

In fact, it's 99% water. If you don't get the water right, you might still make a decent cup of coffee, but why take chances with such an important ingredient? If you take precautions with drinking water, remember those precautions with coffee water. Purified water makes good coffee. At a minimum, keep a Brita water pitcher full in the fridge.


Golden Rule #4: Heat is the enemy of brewed coffee.

We like our coffee hot. It's a drink served hot. But, heat burns anything liquid the more that liquid is exposed to the heat. After 20 minutes of your coffee sitting on the coffee machine's heat plate, consider that coffee to be beginning to burn. After 40 minutes, the difference in taste should be noticeable. And, burnt coffee is not distinguished like blackened chicken or tuna. Burnt coffee is not good coffee. Some coffee machines have heat settings for the plate to resolve the very problem of burnt coffee. If you have such a machine, just leave the heat setting on Low and never touch it again. Even better machines have a switch to identify that a small amount of coffee is being made, say 2-4 cups. After all, the heat required for a full pot is a lot of heat to apply to only a quarter or half of a pot. The less expensive coffee machines don't tend to have these bells and whistles. They normally just have an on/off switch. As with most quality, you get what you pay for.


Golden Rule #5: Clean everything that comes in the coffee's path.

The compartment of the coffee machine that holds the grinds. Want proof? Wipe yours right now with a paper towel. You should notice coffee residue on the paper towel from multiple brewings. Your coffee pot. Your mug. Your spoon. Your spoon-holder. All of these things come into contact with brewed coffee, and like any liquid, it leaves its mark unless entirely cleaned. Most people wouldn't consider that this coffee residue is as perishable as coffee, and begins to go stale over a short period. In fact, there is a natural oil in coffee that makes its residue extra 'sticky'. Soap and water is the easiest way to clean anything.


Golden Rule #6: Plan for when you make coffee.
If there's one theme connecting all of the previous five Golden Rules, it's that it takes planning and preparation to make good coffee.

Tools: To make the perfect cup of coffee, it starts with the coffee machine. Buy a coffee machine with heat settings for the plate, a switch to identify that a small pot is being made, and a tone that sounds or beeps to identify that the coffee is finished brewing. That way, you can pour a cup as quickly as it's brewed.

Storage: Now, you need ceramic containers designed to be airtight. These are available from kitchen stores for spices, beans, and many cooking ingredients. That have a metal latch that creates the airtight seal, which should consist of a rubber hand underneath the lid in place to seal with the container when the latch is closed.

Whole Beans: Next, the main event. The coffee beans themselves. Buy them whole. Often when you do, you'll be asked, "Do you want the beans ground?" Answer with a 'no', but act like you're insulted, too. You should have a nearby retailer that sells whole coffee beans, and I don't mean the grocery store. The beans that most grocery stores sell in addition to ground coffee is whole, but there's no accounting for how a grocery store takes care of its coffee beans. Ideally, you want a cafe. Starbucks sells quality coffee beans, in my humble opinion, but the price premium is hard to justify. If all you have near to you is a grocery store or Starbucks, let me know and I'll try to direct you to a good online retailer with affordable prices.


Planning: When you are preparing to make a pot of coffee, make sure all the tools are clean. Measure out as many whole coffee beans as you intend to grind for this pot. Click here for guidelines on the correct ratio of coffee to water. After they're ground, get them in the coffee machine along with some fresh, purified water. As soon as the brewing is complete, begin serving your coffee. If your guests or yourself are having more than one cup of coffee, you might even consider making multiple pots, one for each "round" of coffee that you'll be serving.

Coffee may help protect against liver cancer

That hot cup of coffee may do more than just provide a tasty energy boost. It also may help prevent the most common type of liver cancer.

A study of more than 90,000 Japanese found that people who drank coffee daily or nearly every day had half the liver cancer risk of those who never drank coffee.

The American Cancer Society estimates that 18,920 new cases of liver cancer were diagnosed in the United States last year and some 14,270 people died of the illness. Causes include hepatitis, cirrhosis, excess alcohol consumption and diseases causing chronic inflammation of the liver.

Animal studies have suggested a protective association of coffee with liver cancer, so the research team led by Monami Inoue of the National Cancer Center in Tokyo analyzed a 10-year public health study to determine coffee use by people diagnosed with liver cancer and people who did not have cancer.

Decreased risk
They found the likely occurrence of liver cancer in people who never or almost never drank coffee was 547.2 cases per 100,000 people over 10 years.

But for people who drank coffee daily the risk was 214.6 cases per 100,000, the researchers report in this week’s issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

They found that the protective effect occurred in people who drank one to two cups of coffee a day and increased at three to four cups. They were unable to compare the effect of regular and decaffeinated coffee, however, because decaf is rarely consumed in Japan.

It’s the caffeine in coffee that makes some people nervous and it has been shown in other studies to prompt mental alertness in many people. Some studies have suggested caffeine aggravates symptoms of menopause or intensifies the side effects of some antibiotics. Heavy caffeine use has been linked to miscarriage. But studies have also shown that a skin cream spiked with caffeine lowers the risk of skin cancer in mice.

“It’s an excellent, interesting and provocative study and their conclusions seem justified,” commented Dr. R. Palmer Beasley of the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.

“It will provoke a lot of new work here,” said Beasley, who was not part of the research group.

Reason for effect unclear
While the study found a statistically significant relationship between drinking coffee and having less liver cancer, the authors note that it needs to be repeated in other groups.

And the reason for the reduction remains unclear.

However, Inoue’s team noted that coffee contains large amounts of antioxidants and several animal studies have indicated those compounds have the potential to inhibit cancer in the liver.

In their study, the team also looked at green tea, which contains different antioxidants, and they found no association between drinking the tea and liver cancer rates.

“Other unidentified substances may also be responsible” for the reduction in cancers, they said.

A separate study reported in the same issue of the journal reported no relationship between drinking caffeinated coffee or tea and the rates of colon or rectal cancer.

However, that analysis did find a 52 percent decline in rectal cancer among people who regularly drank two or more cups of decaffeinated coffee.

In that study a team led by Karin B. Michels of Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston analyzed data from two large studies — the Nurses’ Health Study of women and the Health Professionals’ Follow-up Study involving men. The analysis of nearly 2 million person years found 1,438 cases of colorectal cancer.

While they did not find any association between cancer rates and consumption of caffeinated coffee or tea, people who regularly drank two or more cups per day of decaffeinated coffee had about half the incidence of rectal cancer as those who never drank decaf.

The rate of rectal cancer was 12 cases per 100,000 person-years among those who consumed two or more cups of decaffeinated coffee per day. For those who never drank decaffeinated coffee, the rate was 19 cases per 100,000 person-years.

That difference may, however, be due to differences in lifestyle, the researchers commented, suggesting that drinkers of decaffeinated coffee might be more health conscious overall.

The Japanese study was funded by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare of Japan. The U.S. study was funded by the National Institutes of Health.
© 2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.



Coffee may lower breast cancer risk for some women

Women with BRCA1 gene mutations, which confer a high risk of developing breast cancer, might decrease their risk by drinking a lot of coffee, according to a multicenter team of investigators.

Dr. Steven A. Narod, of the University of Toronto, Ontario, and colleagues examined the association between coffee consumption and the risk of breast cancer among 1690 high-risk women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations.

The study included women from 40 clinical centers in four countries. A self-administered questionnaire was used to assess the average lifetime coffee consumption.

The likelihood of developing breast cancer among BRCA mutation carriers who drank 1 to 3 cups of coffee daily, 4 to 5 cups, or 6 or more cups was reduced by 10 percent, 25 percent and 69 percent, respectively, compared to those who drank no coffee, according to the report in the International Journal of Cancer.

When the investigators classified the women by mutation status, they found significant protection from coffee for women with a BRCA1 mutation, but not for carriers of a BRCA2 mutation.

The investigators note that coffee is an important source of phytoestrogens, which may have protective effects.

"The mechanism by which phytoestrogens may beneficially influence the risk of breast cancer has predominantly been attributed to their structural
similarity to endogenous estrogens and their ability to bind to estrogen receptors," Narod and colleagues explain.




Coffee a top source of healthy antioxidants

WASHINGTON - When the Ink Spots sang “I love the java jive and it loves me” in 1940, they could not have known how right they were.

Coffee not only helps clear the mind and perk up the energy, it also provides more healthful antioxidants than any other food or beverage in the American diet, according to a study released Sunday.

Of course, too much coffee can make people jittery and even raise cholesterol levels, so food experts stress moderation.


The findings by Joe A. Vinson, a chemistry professor at the University of Scranton, in Pennsylvania, give a healthy boost to the warming beverage.

“The point is, people are getting the most antioxidants from beverages, as opposed to what you might think,” Vinson said in a telephone interview.

Antioxidants, which are thought to help battle cancer and provide other health benefits, are abundant in grains, tomatoes and many other fruits and vegetables.

Vinson said he was researching tea and cocoa and other foods and decided to study coffee, too.

His team analyzed the antioxidant content of more than 100 different food items, including vegetables, fruits, nuts, spices, oils and common beverages. They then used Agriculture Department data on typical food consumption patterns to calculate how much antioxidant each food contributes to a person’s diet.

They concluded that the average adult consumes 1,299 milligrams of antioxidants daily from coffee. The closest competitor was tea at 294 milligrams. Rounding out the top five sources were bananas, 76 milligrams; dry beans, 72 milligrams; and corn, 48 milligrams. According to the Agriculture Department, the typical adult American drinks 1.64 cups of coffee daily.

That does not mean coffee is a substitute for fruit and vegetables.

“Unfortunately, consumers are still not eating enough fruits and vegetables, which are better for you from an overall nutritional point of view due to their higher content of vitamins, minerals and fiber,” Vinson said.

Dates, cranberries, red grapes

Dates, cranberries and red grapes are among the leading fruit sources of antioxidants, he said.

The antioxidants in coffee are known as polyphenols. Sometimes they are bound to a sugar molecule, which covers up the antioxidant group, Vinson said.

The first step in measuring them was to break that sugar link. He noted that chemicals in the stomach do the same thing, freeing the polyphenols.

“We think that antioxidants can be good for you in a number of ways,” including affecting enzymes and genes, though more research is needed, Vinson said.

“If I say more coffee is better, then I would have to tell you to spread it out to keep the levels of antioxidants up,” Vinson said. “We always talk about moderation in anything.”

His findings were released in conjunction with the annual convention of the American Chemical Society in Washington.

In February, a team of Japanese researchers reported in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute that people who drank coffee daily, or nearly every day, had half the liver cancer risk of those who never drank it. The protective effect occurred in people who drank one to two cups a day and increased at three to four cups.

Diabetes risk
Last year, researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health found that drinking coffee cut the risk of developing the most common form of diabetes.

Men who drank more than six 8-ounce cups of caffeinated coffee per day lowered their risk of type 2 diabetes by about half, and women reduced their risk by nearly 30 percent, compared with people who did not drink coffee, according to the study in Annals of Internal Medicine.

Bonnie Liebman, nutrition director of the Center for Science in the Public Interest, said she was not surprised by Vinson’s finding, because tea has been known to contain antioxidants.

But Liebman, who was not part of Vinson’s research team, cautioned that while many people have faith that antioxidants will reduce the risk of cancer, heart disease and more, the evidence has not always panned out. Most experts are looking beyond antioxidants to the combination of vitamins, minerals other nutrition in specific foods, she said.
© 2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

March 11, 2009

Types of Coffee

Telling one type of coffee from another is part art, part science...and just like tasting wine or chocolate, there's no one right answer. It's all about what YOU like.

This guide will help you learn the difference between the types of coffee you're likely to come across when you visit Scooters Coffeehouse in Shawnee, KS.

* Columbian Supremo - Low levels of acid, rich in body and flavor (Not to be confused with plain old Columbian)
* Brazillian Santo - Bright flavor, Clean Crisp finish
* Costa Rican Tarrazu - Full bodied and sweet with hearty richness and lively acidity



* Mexican High Grown - light bodied, nutty with a chocolate tang and acidic snap
* Panama - Sweet, bright and balanced
* Sumatra - Herbal aroma, full body, low acidity, rich and smooth flavor
* Mokha Java - More acidic and lighter body, quick to finish
* Papua New Guinea - Fruity aroma, earthy body (less full bodied than Sumatra)
* Ethiopian Yirgacheffe - Fruity aroma, light and elegant body, a taste almost like menthol (Southern Ethiopian)
* Kenya AA - Tremendous body, winy acidity, and a black currant flavor
* Jamaican Blue - Nutty aromoa, bright acidity, and a unique beef boullion flavor.
* Hawaiian Kona - Bright and sweet, medium body and flavor

March 10, 2009

Maui Wowi - Franchise Opportunity


Maui Wowi

Serving Fresh Hawaiian blends including Fresh Fruit smoothies, Hawaiian Coffee/Expresso-based beverages, Smoothie Rip-Sticks, Hawaiian Springs Water, Low Carb Smoothies, and EAS Supplements.

Maui Wowi Franchise TrailerMaui Wowi is the number one largest smoothie/espresso franchise in the world. With 24/7 support & extensive training, Maui Wowi offers a simple, profitable and flexible business model. Maui Wowi has thousands of locations and events throughout the country waiting for a Maui Wowi franchise operator. Because of our flexibility, low investment, and variety of business models, Maui Wowi is one of the fastest growing franchises in the world.



* #178 in the Entrepreneur 500 (2004), Maui Wowi is largest Hawaiian-Beverages franchise in the world.
* #33 in Entrepreneur’s Top 101 Franchises (2004) as the fastest home based Franchise in the world.
* #219 Inc. 500’s America’s Fastest Growing Private Companies (2004).

Featured on CNN: “People in the News” August 2003 and on Bloomberg. We owe this honor to developing new product lines and improving the system in response to our franchise owners' requests. We couldn't have done it without them.

Maui Wowi offers you the opportunity to join in the smoothie and coffee revolution and enjoy an escape from typical careers. The popularity of smoothie and coffee increases daily as people want a healthy, delicious, gourmet alternative to typical drinks, snacks, and desserts. Maui Wowi allows franchise owners a great quality of life enjoying a flexible, successful and fun lifestyle. Are you ready to join us?
Quality of Life

Maui Wowi allows you to build a business that fits your lifestyle. Maui Wowi is the perfect low-investment, low-risk business to build wealth while spending time with your family, traveling, or pursuing your dreams! As a Maui Wowi business owner, you can run the show yourself or you can manage the managers. You have the option of working full-time, part-time, from home or hands-on, build your business fast or slow, and enjoy what's important to you!

Location: A great benefit of owning a Maui Wowi business is the flexibility that it will grant you. You have the options from a double drive-thru, store front, in-line store front, build-outs, trailer, cart kiosk and more. You can leave your kiosk in one location, or move it every weekend. Maui Wowi's are successful in malls and office settings, as well as in stadiums, health clubs, at fairs, concerts, and various events. With complete flexibility, you are ensured success.

The Bottom Line: Over the last 22 years, Maui Wowi has created the perfect recipe for success. We took the highest margin, most profitable products, and built a business with low investment, unparalleled flexibility, professionalism, and minimal risk. Add in fun and creativity and you have one of the most profitable business models available today.

Franchise Facts

Established: 1983
Franchised: 1997
US Franchises: 286
International: 0

Franchise Fee: $27,500
Cash Required: $70,000
Total Investment:
$65,000 - $250,000

Training Provided: 4 days at headquarters

Nestle TollHouse Cafe


Nestle TollHouse Cafe

The Nestlé Toll House Cafe by Chip Cookie franchise offers individuals the opportunity to go into business for themselves, but not by themselves.

The Nestlé® Toll House® tradition began back in the 1930's at the Toll House Inn near Boston, Mass., where proprietor Ruth Wakefield became known for the rich, indulgent desserts she baked for weary travelers.

While experimenting one day, she chopped up a bar of Nestlé Semi-Sweet Chocolate into tiny bits and added them to her cookie dough. Instead of melting through the cookie as she expected, the chocolate bits retained their shape, softening to a delicately cream texture. The Toll House Cookie was born and quickly became a favorite.

Today we are pleased to bring you this legendary cookie and other delicious Nestlé Toll House treats fresh from our oven.

Why Nestle® Toll House® by Chip?


* Nestlé is the world's largest food company with products available in nearly every country around the world.
* Nestlé Semi-Sweet Chocolate Morsels are the original "chocolate chip" and are the best selling chocolate chips in America...
* Nescafé is the world's largest coffee brand worldwide.
* Nestlé was listed, in The New York Times, as one of the 100 most powerful brands of the 20th century.

What We Offer
The Nestlé Toll House Cafe by Chip¨ franchise offers individuals the opportunity to go into business for themselves, but not by themselves. Our team members coach Franchisees through the initial stages of site selection all the way through the grand opening of their store! Continued support and guidance throughout the term of the Franchise Agreement are standard protocol for Nestlé Toll House Cafe by Chip.



Nestlé Toll House Cafe by Chip provides a system of support that is mapped out in our Franchisee Operations Manual. The Manual includes a comprehensive training program, proven methods for store operations and procedures documented for use in our Operations Manual. We also offer a dedicated staff for ongoing assistance, and a structured organization adaptable for change as the system requires.

Site Selection
Each franchise is provided with written site selection guidelines and site selection assistance. In addition, we may provide on-site evaluations.

Training
Nestlé Toll House Cafe by Chip's highly structured training program was developed to provide Franchisees with the tools they need to be successful! Trainees will return from our comprehensive full-training program with new skills and the management knowledge it takes to be a Nestlé Toll House Cafe by Chip Franchisee!

Franchise Facts

Established: 2000
Franchised: 2000
US Franchises: 25
International:

Franchise Fee: $25,000
Cash Required: $250,000
Total Investment:
$177,000 - $313,000

Training Provided: Yes

March 9, 2009

Coffee: The New Health Food?

Plenty of health benefits are brewing in America's beloved beverage.
By Sid Kirchheimer
WebMD Feature

Want a drug that could lower your risk of diabetes, Parkinson's disease, and colon cancer? That could lift your mood and treat headaches? That could lower your risk of cavities?

If it sounds too good to be true, think again.




Coffee, the much maligned but undoubtedly beloved beverage, just made headlines for possibly cutting the risk of the latest disease epidemic, type 2 diabetes. And the real news seems to be that the more you drink, the better.
Reducing Disease Risk

After analyzing data on 126,000 people for as long as 18 years, Harvard researchers calculate that compared with not partaking in America's favorite morning drink, downing one to three cups of caffeinated coffee daily can reduce diabetes risk by single digits. But having six cups or more each day slashed men's risk by 54% and women's by 30% over java avoiders.

Though the scientists give the customary "more research is needed" before they recommend you do overtime at Starbuck's to specifically prevent diabetes, their findings are very similar to those in a less-publicized Dutch study. And perhaps more importantly, it's the latest of hundreds of studies suggesting that coffee may be something of a health food -- especially in higher amounts.

In recent decades, some 19,000 studies have been done examining coffee's impact on health. And for the most part, their results are as pleasing as a gulp of freshly brewed Breakfast Blend for the 108 million Americans who routinely enjoy this traditionally morning -- and increasingly daylong -- ritual. In practical terms, regular coffee drinkers include the majority of U.S. adults and a growing number of children.

"Overall, the research shows that coffee is far more healthful than it is harmful," says Tomas DePaulis, PhD, research scientist at Vanderbilt University's Institute for Coffee Studies, which conducts its own medical research and tracks coffee studies from around the world. "For most people, very little bad comes from drinking it, but a lot of good."

Consider this: At least six studies indicate that people who drink coffee on a regular basis are up to 80% less likely to develop Parkinson's, with three showing the more they drink, the lower the risk. Other research shows that compared to not drinking coffee, at least two cups daily can translate to a 25% reduced risk of colon cancer, an 80% drop in liver cirrhosis risk, and nearly half the risk of gallstones.

Coffee even offsets some of the damage caused by other vices, some research indicates. "People who smoke and are heavy drinkers have less heart disease and liver damage when they regularly consume large amounts of coffee compared to those who don't," says DePaulis.

There's also some evidence that coffee may help manage asthma and even control attacks when medication is unavailable, stop a headache, boost mood, and even prevent cavities.

Is it the caffeine? The oodles of antioxidants in coffee beans, some of which become especially potent during the roasting process? Even other mysterious properties that warrant this intensive study?

Actually, yes.

Some of coffee's reported benefits are a direct result of its higher caffeine content: An eight ounce cup of drip-brewed coffee contains about 85 mg -- about three and a half times more than the same serving of tea or cola or one ounce of chocolate.

"The evidence is very strong that regular coffee consumption reduces risk of Parkinson's disease and for that, it's directly related to caffeine," DePaulis tells WebMD. "In fact, Parkinson's drugs are now being developed that contain a derivative of caffeine based on this evidence."

Caffeine is also what helps in treating asthma and headaches. Though not widely publicized, a single dose of pain reliever such as Anacin or Excedrin contains up to 120 milligrams -- what's in a hefty mug o' Joe.
Boost to Athleticism

It's also caffeine -- and not coffee, per se -- that makes java a powerful aid in enhancing athletic endurance and performance, says physiologist and longtime coffee researcher Terry Graham, PhD, of the University of Guelph in Canada. So powerful, in fact, that until recently, caffeine in coffee or other forms was deemed a "controlled" substance by the Olympic Games Committee, meaning that it could be consumed only in small, designated amounts by competing athletes.

"What caffeine likely does is stimulate the brain and nervous system to do things differently," he tells WebMD. "That may include signaling you to ignore fatigue or recruit extra units of muscle for intense athletic performance. Caffeine may even have a direct effect on muscles themselves, causing them to produce a stronger contraction. But what's amazing about it is that unlike some performance-enhancing manipulation some athletes do that are specific for strength or sprinting or endurance, studies show that caffeine positively enhances all of these things."

How does this brew affect growing minds and bodies? Very nicely, it seems, says DePaulis. Coffee, as you probably know, makes you more alert, which can boost concentration. But claims that it improves a child's academic performance can be exaggerated. Coffee-drinking kids may do better on school tests because they're more awake, but most task-to-task lab studies suggest that coffee doesn't really improve mental performance, says DePaulis.

But it helps kids' minds in another way. "There recently was a study from Brazil finding that children who drink coffee with milk each day are less likely to have depression than other children," he tells WebMD. "In fact, no studies show that coffee in reasonable amounts is in any way harmful to children."

On the flip side, it's clear that coffee isn't for everyone. Its legendary jolt in excess doses -- that is, more than whatever your individual body can tolerate -- can increase nervousness, hand trembling, and cause rapid heartbeat. Coffee may also raise cholesterol levels in some people and may contribute to artery clogging. But most recent large studies show no significant adverse effects on most healthy people, although pregnant women, heart patients, and those at risk for osteoporosis may still be advised to limit or avoid coffee.

The bottom line: "People who already drink a lot of coffee don't have to feel 'guilty' as long as coffee does not affect their daily life," says Hu. "They may actually benefit from coffee habits in the long run."

In other words, consume enough caffeine -- whether it's from coffee or another source -- and you will likely run faster, last longer and be stronger. What's enough? As little as one cup can offer some benefit, but the real impact comes from at least two mugs, says Graham. By comparison, it'd take at least eight glasses of cola to get the same effect, which isn't exactly conducive for running a marathon.

But the harder you exercise, the more benefit you may get from coffee. "Unfortunately, where you see the enhancing effects from caffeine is in hard-working athletes, who are able to work longer and somewhat harder," says Graham, who has studied the effects of caffeine and coffee for nearly two decades. "If you a recreational athlete who is working out to reduce weight or just feel better, you're not pushing yourself hard enough to get an athletic benefit from coffee or other caffeinated products."

But you can get other benefits from coffee that have nothing to do with caffeine. "Coffee is loaded with antioxidants, including a group of compounds called quinines that when administered to lab rats, increases their insulin sensitivity" he tells WebMD. This increased sensitivity improves the body's response to insulin.

That may explain why in that new Harvard study, those drinking decaf coffee but not tea beverages also showed a reduced diabetes risk, though it was half as much as those drinking caffeinated coffee.

"We don't know exactly why coffee is beneficial for diabetes," lead researcher Frank Hu, MD, tells WebMD. "It is possible that both caffeine and other compounds play important roles. Coffee has large amounts of antioxidants such as chlorogenic acid and tocopherols, and minerals such as magnesium. All these components have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism."

Meanwhile, Italian researchers credit another compound called trigonelline, which gives coffee its aroma and bitter taste, for having both antibacterial and anti-adhesive properties to help prevent dental cavities from forming. There are other theories for other conditions.

March 8, 2009

Does Obama Drink coffee ....everyday ...?


Facts that Obama doesn't drink coffee and found only few pic about Obama drink his coffe , maybe he doesn't drink it regularly, maybe only for special occasion only.

here you can found 50 others Obama fact you might do not know...


• He collects Spider-Man and Conan the Barbarian comics
• He was known as "O'Bomber" at high school for his skill at basketball
• His name means "one who is blessed" in Swahili
• His favourite meal is wife Michelle's shrimp linguini
• He won a Grammy in 2006 for the audio version of his memoir, Dreams From My Father
• He is left-handed – the sixth post-war president to be left-handed
• He has read every Harry Potter book
• He owns a set of red boxing gloves autographed by Muhammad Ali
• He worked in a Baskin-Robbins ice cream shop as a teenager and now can't stand ice cream
• His favourite snacks are chocolate-peanut protein bars
• He ate dog meat, snake meat, and roasted grasshopper while living in Indonesia
• He can speak Spanish
• While on the campaign trail he refused to watch CNN and had sports channels on instead
• His favourite drink is black forest berry iced tea
• He promised Michelle he would quit smoking before running for president – he didn't
• He kept a pet ape called Tata while in Indonesia
• He can bench press an impressive 200lbs
• He was known as Barry until university when he asked to be addressed by his full name
• His favourite book is Moby-Dick by Herman Melville
• He visited Wokingham, Berks, in 1996 for the stag party of his half-sister's fiancé, but left when a stripper arrived
• His desk in his Senate office once belonged to Robert Kennedy
• He and Michelle made $4.2 million (£2.7 million) last year, with much coming from sales of his books
• His favourite films are Casablanca and One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
• He carries a tiny Madonna and child statue and a bracelet belonging to a soldier in Iraq for good luck
• He applied to appear in a black pin-up calendar while at Harvard but was rejected by the all-female committee.
• His favourite music includes Miles Davis, Bob Dylan, Bach and The Fugees
• He took Michelle to see the Spike Lee film Do The Right Thing on their first date
• He enjoys playing Scrabble and poker
• He doesn't drink coffee and rarely drinks alcohol
• He would have liked to have been an architect if he were not a politician
• As a teenager he took drugs including marijuana and cocaine
• His daughters' ambitions are to go to Yale before becoming an actress (Malia, 10) and to sing and dance (Sasha, 7)
• He hates the youth trend for trousers which sag beneath the backside
• He repaid his student loan only four years ago after signing his book deal
• His house in Chicago has four fire places
• Daughter Malia's godmother is Jesse Jackson's daughter Santita
• He says his worst habit is constantly checking his BlackBerry
• He uses an Apple Mac laptop
• He drives a Ford Escape Hybrid, having ditched his gas-guzzling Chrysler 300
• He wears $1,500 (£952) Hart Schaffner Marx suits
• He owns four identical pairs of black size 11 shoes
• He has his hair cut once a week by his Chicago barber, Zariff, who charges $21 (£13)
• His favourite fictional television programmes are Mash and The Wire
• He was given the code name "Renegade" by his Secret Service handlers
• He was nicknamed "Bar" by his late grandmother
• He plans to install a basketball court in the White House grounds
• His favourite artist is Pablo Picasso
• His speciality as a cook is chilli
• He has said many of his friends in Indonesia were "street urchins"
• He keeps on his desk a carving of a wooden hand holding an egg, a Kenyan symbol of the fragility of life
• His late father was a senior economist for the Kenyan government

March 7, 2009

Making Perfect Coffee

Expert Tips - Brewing Coffee
There are several factors that lead to a good cup - it’s not just the espresso machine. Your coffee has to be fresh (ground coffee loses flavour and body quickly), it has to be ground correctly for the extraction method you are using, the correct amount of coffee must be used - too little gives a thin flavour without balance and your equipment must be cleaned regularly. Water quality is important, use filtered water if possible.

That perfect cup in the cafe is due to the fact that the cafe turns its coffee over quickly so it is always fresh and the Barista making the coffee knows how to get the best from the equipment. Now you can too!

Beans
For the perfect cup, use nothing but the best quality Arabica coffee beans. Arabica beans are also known as 'specialty coffee' and 'gourmet coffee'. Bay Coffee Roasters only use carefully selected Arabica beans from the world over.

Water
If you notice any traces of chlorine, iron, or other minerals in your water, use a quality bottled or filtered water. Softened or distilled water should not to be used to brew coffee as they will affect the flavour of the coffee.

For the perfect water temperature, bring the water to a boil and let it cool a few seconds. Known as 'off the boil', the water is between 90 to 95 degrees Celsius. Water any cooler will not capture the full flavour of the beans. Boiling or reheating coffee literally boils away flavour.

Grind
The type of grind depends on the brewing technique: if the water is in contact with the coffee for a long period of time e.g. when using a plunger, the grind should be coarse.
If the water is to be in contact with the coffee for a short period of time e.g. when using a drip filter, the grind should be fine. Be sure your coffee beans are correctly ground for your brewing method.

It's said the best water-to-coffee ratio is 1 tablespoon of ground coffee (2 tablespoons of whole beans) for each 180ml of water.

The Manual Drip

The Manual Drip brewing process consistently produces superior coffee. Use fine ground coffee. Preheat the carafe or cup with hot water. Add coffee to the filter and place it on top of an insulated coffee carafe or cup. Evenly moisten the grounds (with water off the boil). Wait a few seconds, then add water to the top of the filter. (For more flavour let the grounds coat the sides of the filter, and not settle into the middle). Remove filter and stir coffee.

The Auto Drip
The Auto Drip brewing process produces coffee similar to the Manual Drip. Use fine ground coffee. Fill the coffee maker with cold water. Place a filter into the basket. Add 1 tablespoon ground coffee for each 180ml of water. Place coffee and filter into the holder, close lid, and turn on the machine.

Stove Top
Home Espresso coffee can be made either in a stove top espresso maker e.g. Bialetti or in a domestic electric espresso machine.

Use coffee ground medium fine.

When using a stove top always fill the coffee receptacle to the maximum level and firm down. This is because if there is insufficient coffee, or it is not packed, the water will pass through the coffee too quickly and not extract all the flavours. Unless supplied with a spacer it is not possible to use less coffee only the amount of water can be varied.

Add the required amount of water, fill the coffee holder with grounds wipe any grounds from the rim, firm the grounds and assemble the coffee maker.

Place on the stove until the water boils and the coffee is extracted.

Extraction is complete when the pot starts to hiss. Remove from the stove and wait a few seconds before pouring.


The Plunger or French Press

The Plunger or French Press is an excellent method for brewing the darker roasts and blends of beans and producing a full-textured coffee.

Use a medium to coarse grind of coffee. Preheat the pot and plunger with hot water. Add 1 tablespoon coffee for each 180ml cup into the glass cylinder. Slowly pour the water (just off the boil) into the cylinder and stir the grounds. Set the plunger on top of the cylinder and steep 2 to 4 minutes.

Press plunger down slowly (if the plunger does not press down easily, try a slightly coarser grind.) Allow sediment to settle for 30 seconds before pouring.

Home Espresso
If you are lucky enough to have a home espresso machine follow the manufacturer's instructions. Use medium fine ground coffee. Ask us to grind you a sample.

Ideal extraction will produce a full and persistent crema. Little or no crema indicates that the grind is too fine, a full crema that disipates quickly indicates the grind is too coarse. Good coffee is made in a preheated machine in warm cups. Always run some hot water through your machine first.

Source : Baycoffee.com.au

March 6, 2009

When you ordering coffee in your daily life , what kind of coffee did you exactly want ?


Order Like a Pro

Let's face it...ordering coffee can be intimidating the first few times. Here's how to sound like you know what you're doing...even before you really do!
Hot Stuff - The Basics

Hot Coffee drinks come in several different variations.

* Espresso - Often called a "shot", this is a small serving of very strong coffee, and forms the basis of all the other specialty coffee drinks.
* Latte - Espresso with steamed milk and a little bit of foam on top.
* Cappuccino - Espresso with frothed milk on top.
* Espresso Machiatto - Espresso with very little foam.
* Breve - A latte made with half and half rather than milk.
* Cafe au Lait - Steamed milk with brewed coffee (not espresso).
* Mocha - Latte with dark chocolate.
* White Mocha - Latte with white chocolate
* Americano - Espresso with hot water.
* Italiano - Espresso in brewed coffee.
* Steamer - Not really coffee at all, but steamed milk with one of several flavors added. (Kids love 'em.)

Coffee is an energy drink or not....?

Who thinks that coffee and energy drinks actually work and help you stay awake? Lets say you only got 4 hours of sleep and you have to wake up to go to work and then to school and in order to wake up you either drink coffee or an energy drink and do they actually wake you up or not.

Please share your experience with coffee.
Thanks

March 5, 2009

Do you know Starbucks has changed their logo three times since 1970

Starbucks is the largest coffee house retailer in the world today, with over 15,000 stores in over 42 countries. With a Starbucks store at almost every corner, millions of people see the famous Starbucks logo every day.

The distinctive Starbucks logo has achieved broad visual recognition, equal in familiarity to the Starbucks brand name itself. At the same time, a certain mystique surrounds the trademarked image and the unusual mermaid like figure at the center of the logo. What exactly does the mythical looking figure symbolize or represent, and what does it have to do with coffee?




The original logo, conceived in 1971, was fashioned after a 15th century Norse woodcut, the image of a mythical two-tailed mermaid siren. The siren, as you may recall from Greek mythology, was an alluring and irresistible female figure, typically half-fish/half-women (the mermaid variety). The siren's objective was to a seduce the seagoing mariner with a powerful enticing song most often to the unfortunate demise of the susceptible sailor who could not resist temptation.





With a coffee brown color scheme, the circular ring surrounding the mythological mermaid figure contained the text "Starbucks - Coffee - Tea - Spices". The overall image was designed to resemble a cigar band label.

The symbolism of the mermaid siren was not intended to suggest the demise of the customers who bought the coffee, but rather, to represent the irresistible and seductive quality of the coffee itself.

Over the last thirty five years, the logo has undergone several significant changes, while still adhering to the original theme.

The original version remained in use until 1987 when Howard Schultz raised sufficient capital from local investors to purchase Starbucks from the founders for 3.7 million.


Schultz had previously left Starbucks in 1985 to pursue his vision of a European style espresso cafe when he started the Il Giornale coffee house. The Il Giornale logo reflected a theme of speed with the head of Mercury, the swift messenger god of Roman mythology, at the center. The theme of swift speed fit well with espresso. Espresso translates to a "fast and express" coffee in Italian.

After the purchase of Starbucks in 1987, the Starbucks logo was cleaned up a bit, a little more befitting of a new corporate image. The bare breasts were covered up by the mermaids flowing hair, although her belly button was still visible. And the color scheme was changed from a coffee brown in the original logo to the familiar green established by the Il Giornale logo. The text in the surrounding circular band was changed to simply "Starbucks Coffee".


Second Starbucks logo, 1987 to 1992




A third revision of the Starbucks logo in 1992 crops the image of the mermaid with a close-up view. Her navel is no longer visible. The mermaid's tails on either side are mostly obscured which creates some mystery and question for those not familiar with the earlier logo.

Current Starbucks logo


Recently, with the April 2008 introduction of the new Pike Place Roast blend, Starbucks has re-introduced a version of the original logo. While this is not a replacement for the current Starbucks logo, you'ill find this retro-logo on the Pike Place Roast cups, and Pike Place Roast bags of coffee beans.

This new logo version is similar to the cigar motif of the original logo from the 1970’s with a few differences. The phrase around the perimeter of the old logo was “Starbucks - Coffee - Tea - Spices”. The new logo retains the familiar “Starbucks - Fresh Roasted Coffee”. And the bare breasts in the original mermaid image are not covered with her flowing locks of hair.

The marketing objective in bringing back this version of the original logo compliments the campaign slogan "Roasting coffee since 1971. The best cup then. The best cup now”.

Acknowledgement to the DeadProgrammers Blog for the excellent Starbucks logo detective work, and to Brand Autopsy's The Evolution of the Starbucks Logo for additional Starbucks logo research and reference to Howard Schultz's "Pour Your Heart Into It : How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time".

From : gourment-coffee-zone.com

March 4, 2009

Coffee - As a Health Drink?




It is a pity that coffee does not get the credit and the attention it deserves. Coffee tends to get bad press and focus on negative effects of caffeine and we generally underestimate the importance of coffee in our life. Coffee is seen just as a drink, but it actually provides countless health benefits. Coffee may not be in the prescription by a physician. But nevertheless it plays a significant role in ensuring a healthy life for us.

People love coffee. They start their daily routine with a steaming cup of coffee in the early morning. But it is a question whether they really realize the benefits of coffee as a health drink. Coffee stops headache. It boosts your mood. These are the good things about coffee that all of us know. But there are more than what eyes meet in coffee matters.

• Research has shown that coffee minimizes the risk of diabetes.

• Believe it or not, coffee lowers the risk of Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. People who drink coffee regularly are around 80% less likely to be affected by Parkinson's disease than who do not take coffee at all.

• Regular drinking of coffee distances you from colon cancer. Daily two cups of coffee, the risk you may get colon cancer is reduced by 25%.

• Two cups of caffeinated coffee per day, liver cirrhosis risk is decreased by 80%.

• Moderate intake of coffee reduces the risk of developing gallstones.

• Coffee reduces the risk of early stage diabetes. Coffee improves insulin sensitivity and it reduces blood sugar levels. Research has shown that if you drink three cups of caffeinated coffee per day, diabetes risk is reduced by considerable amount. If you drink six cups of caffeinated coffee daily, risk of diabetes is reduced by a whopping 50%.

• Coffee may help ward off asthma. Coffee eases out the nasal passages and improves airflow.

• Coffee contains antioxidants that fight against viral infection. One cup of coffee contains more antioxidants than one cup of grape juice!

• Coffee contains chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, and protocatechnic acid. These chemicals show excellent antibacterial effects.

• Caffeine present in coffee is a psychoactive substance. It improves one's mood and enhances performance.

• Coffee reduces fatigue effectively and it is an active stimulant.

• Around 100 ml of coffee every hour you can stay all night awake. Coffee delays sleep and reduces sleep time.

• Coffee makes you more alert. If you drink coffee whole day you will be alert throughout the day.

• Coffee prevents formation of dental cavities.

But coffee has its downside as well. It is an addictive drink. People who drink coffee daily in the long run become an addict, not just to that smell and taste, but to the caffeine content. They can reach a state where seems impossible for them to function in life without a cup of their favorite coffee and its likable bitter taste. If you make drinking coffee a regular habit, it certainly presents you numerous benefits like improved mood, enhanced performance, and reduction of risks of a lot of diseases including cancer. But what if you cannot drink your coffee at the usual time you take it? You may suffer from a headache. Fatigue reaches you. You feel restless. Your mood becomes dull. Your performance gets affected. If you regularly consume a large amount of coffee and stop drinking it suddenly you may suffer the withdrawal symptoms of caffeine addiction. This results in more adverse effects. Your blood sugar level becomes imbalanced. Your blood pressure gets affected. You may become easily impatient and get easily stressed. If you find this happening to you it is advisable to reduce your regular coffee intake and ease yourself out of your strong caffeine addiction. Limiting your daily intake will reduce your dependence on caffeine.

Though coffee has its own list of health benefits, like anything else, it should be taken only in moderation. Too much coffee has its own downside. So drink your cup of coffee, but only in a moderate amount to ensure a healthy you.



Source : http://www.articlesbase.com/food-and-beverage-articles

$ 100 for just one cup of coffee..?




LONDON, THURSDAY -
ask the British people, what's most expensive coffee in the world, the nation's of tea drinker will answer - Kopi luwak , the coffee that taken from civet dung. This presumption may be the same as the traditional society of Indonesia.

Why are these coffee so expensive ?
In United kingdom the coffee that has been eaten civet (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus) and out again through his pup. Selling price this kind of coffee reach about 50 PoundsSterling , almost 1 million rupiah and if we converted in US its $ 100 per cup, yes per cup , not per box....
what an expensive price ,reported in the Daily Mail's internet site, on Thursday (10 / 4/ 2008).

If you know the the origin of coffee, some coffee lovers will tremble.

But for Peter Jones cafes, that coffee is the most selling coffee in his cafe in Sloane Square that sell espresso, latte and Americano coffee beans. He start to selling to most expensive coffee in april 2008 .

Would you like to know from where Jones get the raw materials that make his cafe famous ?
He purchased 60 packages exclusive mix of Jamaican Blue Mountain Coffee and Kopi luwak from Indonesia. This kind of Coffee beans is rare, because the harvest is less than 200 kg per year.

Believed, mongoose (a wolf in the Javanese language)or in Indonesia they called Luwak can select the best coffee beans based on his instinct. They select seeds and eat the soft, but only the outside that can be digested, while the rest is discarded along with the dirt. Liquid stool that is believed to enrich the taste of coffee mongoose.

Now, customers can feel Jones sensation Kopi luwak.
Meanwhile, all profits from sales will be donated to cancer.

One customer Jones, Hannah Silver (23) said, "I was quite worried before trying, but it turns out that Kopi Luwak was one of the best coffee I ever taste.

Coffee make you addicted...?






Almost all relevant authorities believe that caffeine is not a genuinely addictive product. There are several criteria given as to why caffeine is not considered an addictive substance compared to other beverages, such as alcohol, and many recreational drug substances that are considered to be addictive.

With coffee consumption, there is little or no increased tolerance to dose, so a coffee lover does not need to increase amounts of coffee or caffeine to achieve the effects they enjoy. This means the consumer who likes three cups of coffee today to enjoy the sensations will not need five or six cups to feel the same way in a few years . This is very different from genuinely addictive products such as alcohol and many forms of illegal drugs where regular users will be inclined to increase intake to achieve the same feeling.

Secondly, withdrawal is not genuinely a challenge. Someone who wished to stop drinking coffee could just moderate their consumption downward for several days to stop drinking completely with no effects. Caffeine withdrawal usually only appears amongst a small percentage of regular coffee consumers who abruptly stop their caffeine consumption. They may experience mild headaches, irritability and nervousness from sudden deprivation.

Thirdly, as much fun as can be made of a coffee lover's craving for a cup of coffee, there are no anti-social behaviours linked to caffeine consumption.

If for any reason you are advised to stop or reduce your caffeine intake, just reduce consumption gradually to the desired level, or to no intake at all

http://www.coffeeandhealth.ca/caffeine.htm

March 3, 2009

Kelly's Coffee & Fudge Factory - Coffee Franchise




Kelly's Coffee & Fudge Factory blends the rapidly expanding market of specialty coffee retailing with an extensive menu of freshly baked pastries, sandwiches, salads, and home-style fudge, which appeals to the entire family.

A sound year-round business opportunity.

Everything is manufactured daily on the premises to ensure freshness of product. Specialty coffees and specialty frozen drinks such as Mocha Freeze creates a year round draw for business.

The high-quality product assortment includes gourmet coffee drinks (hot, cold or frozen), specialty teas, a wide variety of fudge, baked goods, homemade candies, caramel apples and Rice Krispies Treats. Everything is manufactured daily on the premises to ensure freshness.

Kelly's coffees are of the highest grade (species Arabica AA&A), with the customer's order filled directly from the roaster to produce the freshest coffee available. The company also offers complete coffee brewing accessories, espresso pots, filers, grinders, cups and other paraphernalia, as well as a selection of bulk (loose) and stash (bags) teas.


Franchise Concepts


The franchise development process for Kelly's Coffee & Fudge includes a comprehensive support program beginning with real estate selection and design and concept of store. Kelly's real estate department assists with location availability and site selection. We also provide management, staff and operations training for a successful operation.

At the outset, estimated start-up fees range from $200,000 to $250,000 including franchise fee, equipment, initial supplies, deposits, insurance, leasehold improvements, architectural engineering, and initial working capital. Kelly's Franchise Operations Department will provide you with assistance researching and launching your very own Kelly's store.


Percolating for Growth, Some Site Requirements

Optimum site sizes range from 800 to 1,400 square feet. Potential sites include freestanding facilities, end caps, and pads. Also, in-line space within exceptionally well located entertainment centers, power centers, community centers,neighborhood shopping centers and malls should be considered.


Franchise Facts

Established: 1983
Franchised: 1983
US Franchises: 42
International: 1

Franchise Fee: $20,000
Cash Required: $150,000
Total Investment:
$200,000 - $300,000

Training Provided: 1 Week at HQ and 1 Week during Opening.

request info: http://www.dreamfranchises.com

Starbucks Coffee Franchise....?


Starbucks Franchise Facts

It's funny that among all the industry related searches among search engines like Google and Yahoo, the search for "Starbucks Franchise" is among the most popular. Yes thousands of people each month for one reason or another go looking for a "starbucks franchise" online.

We get this question all the time "How Much Does a Starbucks Franchise Cost?



Maybe they're looking after the Starbucks Success story around the world

However , bad news java fans, Starbucks is not a franchise!

I quote the Stabucks.com FAQ below:

Q: Does Starbucks Franchise?
A: No, Starbucks does not franchise to individuals. However, in situations in which a master concessionaire or other company controls or can provide improved access to desirable retail space (such as an airport), the Company may consider licensing its operations to such a company.

Coffee Hair Rinse




This short tips will make your hair shiny

(for brunettes and redheads)

* 8 cups warm brewed coffee

After shampooing rinse hair with coffee. Do not rinse it out. Your hair will be rich and shiny.

don't forget, no sugar Please... and no creamer

Benefits of Coffee




Researchers from the University of Scranton released on August 29, 2005 that coffee is the No. 1 source of antioxidants in the American diet. Black tea is the second. Antioxidants are substances or nutrients in foods that can prevent or slow oxidative damage to our body. When our cells utilize oxygen, they naturally produce free radicals (by-products) which can cause damage to other cells. Antioxidants act as "free radical scavengers" and hence prevent and repair damage inflicted by these free radicals. Fruits and vegetables are hailed as the richest sources of antioxidants, but this study shows that coffee is the main source from which most Americans get their antioxidants. Both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee appear to provide similar amounts of antioxidants.

By Gloria Tsang
http://www.healthcastle.com/coffee.shtml

World’s Rarest Coffee Brews - Norwegian Egg Coffee

To most people, it is quite unusual to brew coffee with an egg in it. However, this is a traditional Norwegian method for making coffee.

How to make it? First, you have to break a single
egg and mix the egg with a half a cup of water (about 120 ml) in a slow heated saucepan. Then, add a cup of ground coffee with six cups of boiling water (about 1.5 liter) and leave it to boil in slow heat for about 3-4 minutes. After that, add a half cup of very cold water and let it steep for another 9 minutes before serving.

I bet you would expect a coffee with a mixture of egg floating in it. What's unusual about this coffee is that, you will get a rich, clear coffee. This is due to the fact that the egg protein binds with the ground coffee and it settles the grounds, providing the coffee with the richness in its taste. This is when a half cup of very cold water is added suddenly to the mixture.

Note that there are many variations in making the Norwegian Egg Coffee. Some people may even use the egg together with the shell (broken up). In this case, the coffee must be carefully strained to remove pieces of egg shell. Some people may use only the egg whites. In any cases, whichever method you use, the result will still be the same, i.e. clear and rich coffee.


by sher d fly

World’s Rarest Coffee Brews - Reishi Coffee




“Reishi” means red mushrooms in Japanese. Coffee blend which include Reishi is normally consumed for the maintenance of health and general well-being. This healthy drink has been commercialized by a number of companies and has increasingly becomes common now. However, the ones produced under an American brand called ReishiGo is quite unusual.

This special blend of Reishi coffee contains the whole Reishi mushroom including the fruit body, cracked spores, and mycelium, which claims to be more potent in terms of de-oxidation and efficacy. Actually you can see the said mushroom floating in the coffee.

by Sher d.Fly

Barista..........??? mm mm mm don't know what is this about...



Barrista....?

What is this.,
kind of thing ? product, brand or profession

What is the different with Barrister...?


If you were to visit a bar or coffeeshop in Italy, you might very well encounter a uniformed bartender called a barista. In Italy, a barista is a trained mixologist familiar with both alcohol and coffee-based drinks. He or she might even wear an elaborate jacket similar to that of a bandmaster or military officer. A barista is usually treated as a respected specialist, in the same vein as a wine steward or sommelier.

When the gourmet coffee industry exploded onto the scene during the 1980s and 1990s, however, the term barista took on a slightly different meaning. A barista in the coffeehouse sense is an expert in producing espresso and espresso-based drinks. Expresso is an intensely-flavored form of coffee generally served in a small cup called a demitasse. In order to brew a perfect cup of espresso, a barista must place a measured amount of ground coffee into a wire basket and tamp it down firmly. The wire basket is then locked under the spout of an espresso machine.

A trained barista should know precisely how much hot water should be forced through the mesh and for how long. If the time is too short, the espresso will be weak and watery. If the barista spends too much time, the espresso will be too strong to drink. It is this intimate knowledge of an espresso machine's capabilities that make a good barista indispensable to a coffeeshop. A barista may also have to create a good froth from steamed milk or allow the espresso to form a natural dark layer on top called a crema.



The skills of a barista go beyond being a good coffee maker. In some coffeeshops, a barista is also expected to have a working knowledge of all of the different blends of gourmet coffees offered. Customers may also ask a barista about roasting times or which grinder settings work best. A good barista also learns different garnishing techniques, such as creating signature designs with stir sticks and cream. There are national and international barista competitions which put all of these skills to the ultimate test.


Oh almost forgot..so what is barrister...?
from Wikipedia..A barrister is a lawyer found in many common law jurisdictions that employ a split profession in relation to legal representation

March 2, 2009

How much caffeine consumed from your coffee drink




The majority of all caffeine consumed worldwide comes from coffee—in some countries, this figure is as high as 85%.

Depending on the type of coffee and method of preparation, the caffeine content of a single serving can vary greatly. On average, the following amounts of caffeine can be expected in a single cup of coffee—about 207 milliliters (7 fluid ounces)—or single shot of espresso—about 44–59 mL (1.5–2 fl oz)

Drip coffee: 115–175 mg
Espresso: 100 mg
Brewed: 80–135 mg
Instant: 65–100 mg
Decaf, brewed: 3–4 mg
Decaf, instant: 2–3 mg


Taken from www.coffeefacts.com

March 1, 2009

Vietnamese drip coffee - Ca phe phin:




My coffee-aficionado friend has had plenty of ca phe sua da or Vietnamese iced coffee before, but he was particularly intrigued with this old-school method of using a phin or metal coffee filter for ca phe phin, Vietnamese drip coffee. You can find it at restaurants in Little Saigon but they're increasingly switching over to pre-made iced coffees. It's really easy to do it yourself at home, just takes a bit o' patience.


You can buy the phin or metal filter at most Little Saigon supermarkets for under $3.

It comes with three pieces, clockwise, from left to right: The filter, the lid and the press (the flat disc with a metal rod coming out of it).

First, pour some condensed milk into a glass. Pick a clear glass if you're a nerd like me and like watching the coffee action. I usually go with several tablespoons as it helps to cut the super potent and dark roast Vietnamese coffee, but you can always add more later.

You can also pick up a bag of dark roast coffee grounds at most Vietnamese markets, typically at the cash register. My folks go to Vien Dong Supermarket in Garden Grove for their ca phe. About $5 a bag.

Put a kettle of water on to boil. Then, before you put the coffee grounds into the filter, be sure to take out the press. Add a few spoonfuls of coffee grounds into the filter until it's almost halfway full for a strong serving. (Or roughly three teaspoons.) Place the press back into the filter and screw the rod back into place if need be. (Erik did a great job his first time -- betcha thought those large hands were mine, huh?)

Then pour the boiling water into the filter to the top. Cover with the lid and wait about 15 minutes or so.

The coffee will start drip, drip, dripping ... be patient ... after the water goes down, you'll likely want to add one more round of hot water.

Then you just stir up the condensed milk and coffee together and either drink it hot or add ice. And some more condensed milk if need be. Enjoy! your delightful cup of Vietnamese Coffee

Taken from

World rarest and unique Coffee brew - Cold Brew Coffee




The notion of cold-brewed coffee sounded to us, frankly, weird, to most people, brewing coffee minus the heat is quite impossible
After all, heat seems intrinsic to the coffee process. Why would you possibly want to leave grounds soaking for half a day in an ugly plastic pitcher, like so much Kool-Aid? There's only one possible reason we were willing to try the Toddy coffee system, one of a handful of cold-brew options available: It works.

In the beginning
The idea of commercializing the method of brewing coffee without the heat or cold brewing came from a chemical engineer, Todd Simpson. It is said that in 1964 he got the idea in a small café in Guatemala. This is when he received a small flask of cool concentrate and some boiling water upon ordering. This makes him wonder whether his mother, who couldn't stomach coffee, might be able to enjoy the cold coffee instead. Eventually his mother could and this leads him to develop the cold brewing device known as the “Toddy system” which is being commercialized now.
Todd Simpson believes that it may be an ancient Peruvian method, and coffee concentrates first showed up in 19th-century America. Another theory traces it back to Java. However, nobody knows for sure where cold coffee brewing method came from.
No heat, no plug
It's not an immediately comfortable transition. The technology is profoundly low-tech: a plastic pitcher with a fabric filter, sitting atop a carafe that catches the finished product. No electricity needed, just gravity, a pound of ground beans and nine cups of cold water. That and 10 to 12 hours steeping time.
It is said that the coffee produced through this method is less acidic, less caffeine and also friendly to sensitive stomach. Toddy claims to brew up two-thirds less caffeine than regular coffee; in a side-by side test using Starbucks' regular blend, the Toddy version had a pH of 6.31 and 40 mg of caffeine per 100 grams of coffee, while Starbucks store-brewed clocked in at a pH of 5.48 and 61 mg of caffeine. (Lower numbers on the pH scale, which is measured logarithmically, denote more acid.)